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Pierce Family of North Bridgewater, MA

The Pierce families of this country are and have long been very numerous. Early in the settlement of New England came representatives from England, most of them not related, so far as now known. Among them were Abraham, of Plymouth, 1623, who became one of the original purchasers of Bridgewater in 1645; Daniel, of Newbury, blacksmith, who came from Ipswich, County of Suffolk, in 1634, aged twenty-three years; John, of Dorchester, mariner from Stepney, Middlesex, before 1631; another John, of Dorchester and Boston; John, of Watertown, 1638; Capt. Michael, of Hingham and Scituate; Richard, of Portsmouth, R. I.; Robert, of Dorchester; Thomas, of Charlestown, who was admitted to the church there in 1634; and Capt. William, of Boston, who was a distinguished shipmaster of his time.

Cheltenham Veterans Cemetery, Cheltenham, Maryland

11301 Crain Highway Cheltenham, Maryland 20623 Martin Fahey, Superintendent 301-372-6398 Cheltenham State Veterans Cemetery is located on U.S. Route 301, approximately 8 miles south of Upper Marlboro, Maryland. The site consists of 102 acres and was formerly used for agricultural purposes. Currently, the Cheltenham Veterans Cemetery is conducting more than 825 burials each year and is the final resting place for over 17,000 Maryland veterans and their dependents. The cemetery opened for burial in July 1978 and is expected to provide a total of 50,000 burial sites. The Chapel at the cemetery was dedicated to the memory of Senator Edward T. Conroy, who was instrumental in the passage of legislation enabling the development of Maryland’s State Veterans Cemeteries. You can also download a map and general cemetery information. Cemetery Hours: Cemetery gates will be open to visitors every day of the year from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. The gates will close at 4:45 p.m. to allow visitors to exit the cemetery. The cemetery will remain open until 8:00 p.m. on Memorial Day (the date of State observance). Cemetery Transcriptions: Cheltenham Veterans Cemetery currently only has one listing online, providing internments and photographs. Cheltenham Veterans Cemetery...

Hackleman Family Record

This is a transcript of the first 31 pages of Elijah Hackleman’s Scrap book No. 2. The original is in the Wabash County Indiana Historical Museum. Although material of genealogical significance is to be found throughout the scrapbook, the material following deals with the Hackleman family. Michael Hackleman was born in Germany about the year 1720. He migrated to America in the seventeenth year of his age (1737) and was bound to a Maryland, or Pennsylvania farmer for three years to pay for his passage. He finally cleared twenty-six acres of land, and squared the account. He married Mary Sailors in March of 1751, and settled on the Susquehanna River, near the line of Pennsylvania and Maryland. He later in life moved to the Abbeville District, South Carolina where he died in 1808. His children were named Jacob, Lydia, Conrad, John and George.

Biography of Hon. Rezin Davidge

Among the early practitioners at the bar of Christian County, none surpassed in profound legal attainments Rezin Davidge. He was a brilliant and forcible speaker, an excellent judge of law, and a faithful and conscientious attorney. Strength of mind and purity of purpose were his leading traits. In his profession of the law, these made him a great chancery lawyer, no doubt one of the ablest the county knew in the early period of its history. In that branch of the law practice, that sometimes requires scheming and cunning diplomacy, he was neither great nor very successful, a proof that his nature was faithful and just, and that his integrity of mind was better adapted to the equity courts. Judge Davidge was a native of Maryland, born in Baltimore County about the year 1770, and came to Kentucky soon after its admission into the Union as a State. He died in Hopkinsville, at ninety-seven years of age, and sleeps in the beautiful cemetery adjacent to the city. He came of a noted and wealthy family, and received all the educational advantages afforded by the infant Republic, with a finishing course in Europe. Thus his mental cultivation had been extensive, and his reading of a wider range than the average young man was able to obtain. In early life he served as midshipman in the United States Navy, and distinguished him-self as a gallant young officer. He had read law before his visit to the old country, and after a stay there of a year or two, enjoying the advantages of wisdom derived from such men as Pitt and Fox,...

The Mudd Family of Prairie du Rocher Illinois

The influential farmer, James Duncan Mudd of Prairie du Rocher, is a member of the oldest family of settlers in Randolph County. Indeed, his family has been in America since the very earliest days, having come over to Maryland in the time of Lord Baltimore. This band of stout-hearted Englishmen set out from their native shores in 1633 and sought religious freedom in the new world. They established the Church in North America and guaranteed religious liberty, where until then there had been only Puritan fanaticism. The Mudd family were original settlers of this colony. After the Revolution, when the tide of westward emigration set in, Thomas Mudd and his wife Johanna Carrick Mudd, proceeded to Kentucky, where they were among the earliest settlers. They settled in Spencer County. This Thomas Mudd had seven sons and two daughters, the third son being Francis. Francis Mudd was born in 1795 in Maryland, emigrated from there to Kentucky with his parents, and there grew to manhood, with such slight educational advantages as the wilderness afforded. In the War of 1812 he volunteered, and served throughout the war. He was with Jackson at New Orleans when that great general with his regiments of stalwart pioneers won one of the most brilliant victories that we ever achieved over the British. On his return he was married in 1819 to Louisa Dough, and three years later moved to Randolph County. Thus the family had been among the very first settlers of three states, Maryland, Kentucky and Illinois. Francis Mudd claimed a farm in Section 29, Township 5, Range 8, and lived here the peaceful...

The O’Hara Family of Prairie du Rocher Illinois

Henry O’Hara and his family, consisting of his wife, Margaret Brown O’Hara, and ten children, left Fredrick County, Maryland, in the latter part of 1811 and moved to Nelson County, Kentucky. His children, born in order here named, were: Mary, Amellia, Catherine, James, Thomas, Samuel, Henry, Sarah, John, and Charles. The family lived on a farm in Kentucky for six years, and in the fall of 1817 set out by wagons for the State Illinois. Arriving in Illinois, they lived during the winter of 1817 in the Mississippi bottom, south of Cahokia, and in the spring of 1818 moved on a farm four miles below Prairie du Rocher, along the bluff, where they resided until 1819, then moved six miles north to claim No. 1284, survey No. 611, and from that time the place was known as the O’Hara Settlement. When Henry O’Hara left Kentucky he bought, in Beardstown, the works of their clock, and when he was established in his home, O’Hara Settlement, he had the case built at Kaskaskia and the clock works placed in it. After the death of Henry O’Hara, Sr., which occurred in June, 1826, the clock became the property of his eldest son, James O’Hara. James O’Hara continued to reside on the homestead until his death, which occurred April 8, 1884, he being 84 years and 5 months old. By will of James O’Hara, his youngest son Charles became the owner of the clock. This clock has, during all the years from the time it was first put in operation up to the present time, been a true and reliable timekeeper and has...

Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities

James Smith, pioneer, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. When he was eighteen years of age he was captured by the Indians, was adopted into one of their tribes, and lived with them as one of themselves until his escape in 1759. He became a lieutenant under General Bouquet during the expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764, and was captain of a company of rangers in Lord Dunmore’s War. In 1775 he was promoted to major of militia. He served in the Pennsylvania convention in 1776, and in the assembly in 1776-77. In the latter year he was commissioned colonel in command on the frontiers, and performed distinguished services. Smith moved to Kentucky in 1788. He was a member of the Danville convention, and represented Bourbon county for many years in the legislature. He died in Washington county, Kentucky, in 1812. The following narrative of his experience as member of an Indian tribe is from his own book entitled “Remarkable Adventures in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith,” printed at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1799. It affords a striking contrast to the terrible experiences of the other captives whose stories are republished in this book; for he was well treated, and stayed so long with his red captors that he acquired expert knowledge of their arts and customs, and deep insight into their character.

Rocky Gap Veterans Cemetery

Rocky Gap Veterans Cemetery is a 27 acre site located within the Rocky Gap State Park, just off State Route 68 in Allegany County. The Rocky Gap Veterans Cemetery is approximately 10 miles east of Cumberland and is, arguably, the most beautiful of the five State Veterans Cemeteries.

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