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Delaware Indian Allotments

Tishcohan A Delaware Chief

This collection provides the names of Delaware and Cherokee Indians involved in the segregation and allotment of lands in the Cherokee Nation to the Delaware Indians. It also provides a comprehensive history with supporting documentation of the actions taken. For those researchers attempting to identify their ancestor in the Final Rolls, this may help identify the card number for your ancestor. After you find your ancestor listed on these pages, make a note of the Card Number, and go to the Final Roll Database and search there. Put OS (Old Settler or Old Series) in front of the Card Number and search.



Dahcotah, Or Life and Legends of the Sioux around Ft. Snelling

Teton Dakota

The materials for the following pages were gathered during a residence of seven years in the immediate neighborhood nay in the very midst of the once powerful but now nearly extinct tribe of Sioux or Dahcotah Indians. Fort Snelling is situated seven miles below the Falls of St. Anthony, at the confluence of the Mississippi



Campbell’s Abstract of Creek Indian Census Cards

Example of Census Card

The publication of the Tribal Rolls, in 1907, gave the roll number, name of the allottee, age, sex and blood, and operated to a large extent to inform the public, but this information was not sufficient, in fact, it aided only those who, by reason of their familiarity with the workings and records of the Indian Offices, knew how to secure additional information. John Campbell set out to help researchers determine the family relationships between the allottee’s by providing an abstract index of all names from the records. This index has proven invaluable over time by providing a quick method to research family relationships within the tribal rolls.



Life Among the Choctaw Indians

A Building in or about Fort Coffee

Henry Benson worked as a missionary amongst the Choctaw at the Fort Coffee Academy for Boys in the mid 1800′s. In this manuscript he depicts the formation of the Academy and missionary amongst the Indians, providing valuable insight into the tribal customs of the Choctaw after they had been forcibly moved to the Indian Territory. He also provides glimpses into the lives of westerners before the Civil War in the south-west.



1871 Shawnee Census

Register of the names (census) of members of the Shawnee Tribe of Indians who have moved to and located in the Cherokee Nation, Indian Territory, (prior to the 10th day of June, 1871) within two years from the 9th day of June 1869, in accordance with an agreement entered into by and between the Shawnee Tribe of Indians and the Cherokee Nation of Indians.



Wyandot Government: A Short Study of Tribal Society

In the social organization of the Wyandot four groups are recognized, the family, the gens, the phratry, and the tribe. Society is maintained by the establishment of government, for rights must be recognized and duties performed. In this tribe there is found a complete differentiation of the military from the civil government. The civil government



The Siouan Indians

Sioux Lands

Out of some sixty aboriginal stocks or families found in North America above the Tropic of Cancer, about five-sixths were confined to the tenth of the territory bordering Pacific ocean; the remaining nine-tenths of the land was occupied by a few strong stocks, comprising the Algonquian, Athapascan, Iroquoian, Shoshonean, Siouan, and others of more limited extent. The Indians of the Siouan stock occupied the central portion of the continent. They were preeminently plains Indians, ranging from Lake Michigan to the Rocky mountains, and from the Arkansas to the Saskatchewan, while an outlying body stretched to the shores of the Atlantic.



Story of the Sioux Indians

Sioux Chief Sitting Bull

Of all the Indians on the long journey into the wilderness that the United States had just acquired through the Louisiana Purchase, Lewis and Clark found the Sioux the most quarrelsome, the most menacing of future trouble. In this first encounter at the mouth of the stream they called Teton River, the chiefs accepted the gifts and hospitality of the white men, then strove to detain them and demanded further tribute. Intimidation had been their rule with the traders who had hitherto given them their only contact with the white race; and they did not realize that behind this new group lay the power of a young and growing nation that was spreading over the land that had once been the red man’s alone. Arrows were fixed in their bow’s for flight, and swords were drawn; but the incident passed over without an actual conflict, and the boat that was making its way up the almost unknown reaches of the Missouri went on a space to the island thus named in commemoration of the incident…



Contribution to Passamaquoddy Folklore

Passamaquoddy Tribe

Passamaquoddy Folklore – Read about a variety of folklore and dances passed down by the Passamaquoddy Tribe – includes a few songs with notes.



Ledger of Mrs. Ulessus Kennedy

The records contained here occurred within or around the Allegany Reservation located in Cattaraugus County, New York., and were recorded in an old ledger owned by Mrs. Ulessus Kennedy. The records in this manuscript cover the years of 1880-1947.



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