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1822 Congressional Report on Indian Affairs

1824 Map by Jebediah Morse

Jedediah Morse’s 1822 report to Congress of his travels through Indian Territory on behalf of the office of Secretary of War – Jedediah was tasked by a resolution of Congress to report of his travels amongst the tribes throughout the United States. Acknowledging that he did not visit all of the tribes, and that he relied on known facts and materials for the body of text he provided, Jedediah presented a large collection of tabular data and descriptive content. This data was then used by Congress to shape it’s policies as it dealt with expansion further west, and specifically tribal relations.



Indian Legends of the Stillaguamish

Stoluckquamish

Indian Stories and Legends of the Stillaguamish: These little stories about animals, people and places have been told to me by people whose friendship I value highly. Several of them are now gone to the happy hunting grounds. It is about twenty years ago since the first ones were written down as notes in a scrapbook. Since then, the collection has been increasing steadily. Have told some of them to friends; they have encouraged me to publish, if possible, a few of the more interesting ones. The demand would of course be limited, and as it costs nearly as much to print a small number of books or pamphlets as more, the price will be higher than it should be. It would be the greatest pleasure to me if I could afford to have a couple hundred copies printed and give them away to people who might wish to have them. However, I make no excuse for this effort; I am sure a few people will appreciate it, regardless of poor grammar, and other faults.



Native Americans and South America Cultures

Debrys Map of 1591

In spite of the small number of proved cases of transmission theme is good reason to believe that the cultures of the southeastern United Slates as well as that of the Southwest constituted marginal areas in that succession of semi-civilizations extending through Mexico and Central America to the Andean region of South America.



Indian Schools, Seminaries, and Asylums

Omaha Mission School

Beginning in 1878 the goal was to assimilate Indian people into the general population of the United States. By placing the Indian children in first day schools and boarding schools it was thought this would be accomplished. Federal policy sanctioned the removal of children from their families and placed in government run boarding schools. It was thought they would become Americanized while being kept away from their traditional families. This collection of data focuses on providing the details – names, tribal affiliation, ages, and other data to specifically identify the Native children who boarded, institutionalized, and sometimes died in these “schools.”



Indian Home Guard

Indian Home Guard

During the war of the rebellion a number of the residents of the Indian Territory, members of the various tribes therein located, were organized into regiments for military service in the armies of the United States, and were designated as the First, Second, and Third Regiments of Indian Home Guards. They were regularly mustered into the United States service, borne upon the rolls of the Army, and paid upon the monthly muster and pay rolls by paymasters of the Army. Numbers 1 and 2 of accompanying documents show that those troops were regularly recognized as in service.



Missionary Work Among the Ojibway Indians

Caatousee

The largest freshwater lake in the world is Lake Superior, through the centre of which runs the boundary line between the United States of America and the Dominion of Canada. The Indians call it the “Ojebway Kecheguramee,” that is–literally translated–the Great water of the Ojebways, or as they are often called the Chippeways. The Ojebways



Champlain’s Expedition of 1615 Against the Onondaga

Samuel de Champlain, by E. Ronjat

In the year 1615, there dwelt on the south-eastern shore of Lake Huron, between Lake Simcoe and the Georgian Bay, a nation of Indians who were called in their own language, “Wendats” or “Wyandot,” and by the French ” Huron.” There is no record of their having been visited by the white man prior to the above date. In the same year, the Sieur de Champlain, the Father of French Colonization in America, who had entered the St. Lawrence in 1603 and founded Quebec five years later, ascended the river Ottawa as far as the Huron country-Le Caron, the Franciscan, having preceded him by a few days only. These adventurous pioneers were seeking, in their respective spheres, and by concurrent enterprises, the one to explore the western portions of New France, and the other to establish missions among the North American Indians.



Tribal Migrations East of the Mississippi

Linguisitic Families of American Indians - Powell

The map entitled “Linguistic Families of American Indians North of Mexico”, by J. W. Powell, issued by the Bureau of American Ethnology, Smithsonian Institution, some years ago and several times revised and reprinted, indicates the position of the various groups of tribes when they first became known to Europeans. The map, as its title implies, includes the entire North American continent north of Mexico, but in the present paper, only that portion bordering on the lower Mississippi, and eastward to the Atlantic coast, will be considered.



Legends, Traditions, and Laws of the Six Nations

Atotarho, the First Iroquois Ruler - Plate 70

To animate a kinder feeling between the white people and the Indians, established by a truer knowledge of our civil and domestic life, and of our capabilities for future elevation, is the motive for which this work is founded. The present Tuscarora Indians, the once powerful and gifted nation, after their expulsion from the South,



Famous Indian Chiefs I have Known

Sitting Bull

The following biographies are small glimpses of Indians, who’s names most of us have heard. From these brief writings you can decide if you are interested in further information on one of these great Chieftains. Major-General Oliver Otis Howard, US Army, served in the Civil war prior to coming west. He directed several campaigns against the Native Americans, and negotiated with Chief Joseph in 1877. He has written numerous books on his experiences with the Indians. This particular manuscript is often met with outcries from our readers as his particular point of view of the Chiefs he met often differs with popular sentiments. Come read what Major-General Howard’s assessment of each chief he met was.



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