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1853-1854 Smallpox Visitation to the Moqui

The Moquis have been frequently scourged with epidemics the one accompanied by famine in 1775 was frightful. The severe modern smallpox scourge among the Moquis (which came from Zuñi) was in 1853-1854. Lieutenant Whipple refers to it in his Pacific Railroad Survey Report. He was en route from Zuñi to explore as a side trip the Colorado Chiquito and needed guides. He sent some Zuñians to the Moqui Pueblos for them. In his journal he writes: November 28, 1853 José Maria, Juan Septimo and José Hacha were the guides sent to us by the caciques of Zuñi. They described the country to the Colorado Chiquito as being nearly a level plain with springs of permanent water at convenient distances. This is their hunting ground. Of the country west of that river they know nothing. Moqui Indians are however supposed to have knowledge of the region and we intend to seek among them for a guide. José and Juan are to go as bearers of dispatches to the Moqui native with the understanding that after having accomplished their in mission they will report to us upon the Colorado Chiquito. November 29, 1853 Tomorrow José Marie and Juan Septimo leave our trail and proceed to Moqui At our request they traced a sketch of the Moqui country and the route they propose to travel. They say that the population of the 7 towns of Moqui has been greatly diminished lately and now is about the same as that of Zuñi that is according to our previous estimate 2,000 persons. But it is it difficult matter to determine satisfactorily the population of...

Biographical Sketch of Atlantic A. Moore

Atlantic A. Moore, during the twenty-four years that he resided in Kansas, assisted in the founding of Marion County and became a familiar and respected figure in both houses of the State Legislature. He was familiarly known as “Lank” Moore. A native of Ohio, he came to Wankegan, Illinois, as a boy, living there and in Wisconsin until he “entered the government service” with his brother, as a driver of ambulances from Kansas City to Santa Fe. Not caring to settle in that part of the Southwest, they started on their return in the fall of the same year. At Cottonwood Crossing (now Durham, Kansas) on the Santa Fe trail, a man named Smith had built a small log cabin and was running a trading post, selling whisky, canned goods and other provisions to passing trains. The Moore brothers bought out the place, and later took up a claim at what became known as Moore’s Ranch. In the spring of 1861 a postoffice was established there, with A. A. Moore as postmaster. That year the Town of Marion Center was also laid out, and there Mr. Moore built a store and otherwiso identified himself with the growth of the place. Upon the organization of Marion County in 1865 he was elected county treasuror and representative; was returned to the Legislature in 1867; served in the State Senate in 1868, and was again a member of the House of Representatives in 1871. In 1862 he had been married to Nancy O. Waterman, and in the following year was born Ira A. Moore, the first native white child of Marion County....

Slave Narrative of Doc Daniel Dowdy

Person Interviewed: Doc Daniel Dowdy Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Madison County, Georgia Date of Birth: June 6, 1856 Age: 81 I was born June 6, 1856 in Madison County, Georgia. Father was named Joe Dowdy and mother was named Mary Dowdy. There was 9 of us boys, George, Smith, Lewis, Henry, William, myself, Newt, James and Jeff. There was one girl and she was my twin, and her name was Sarah. My mother and father come from Richmond, Va., to Georgia. Father lived on one side of the river and my mother on the other wide. My father would come over ever week to visit us. Noah Meadows bought my father and Elizabeth Davis, daughter of the old master took my mother. They married in Noah Meadows’ house. My mother was the cook in the Big House. They’d give us pot likker with bread crumbs in it. Sometimes meat, jest sometimes, very seldom. I liked black-eyed peas and still do till now. We lived in weatherboard house. Our parents had corded-up beds with ropes and us chillun slept on the floor for most part or in a hole bored in a log. Our house had one window jest big enough to stick your heat out of, and one door, and this one door faced the Big House which was your master’s house. This was so that you couldn’t git out ‘less somebody seen you. My job was picking up chips and keeping the calves and cows separate so that the calves wouldn’t suck the cows dry. Mostly, we had Saturday afternoons off to wash. I was...

Biography of Samuel R. H. Robinson

In the history of railroad building throughout the American continent the name of Samuel Roland Hiland Robinson figures prominently. For many years he was accorded and executed most important contracts of that character, being associated with the construction of many of the most important times west of the Mississippi as well as in Canada and in Mexico. He developed splendid executive ability, and his administrative direction of his affairs showed him to be a man of keen insight and wide vision. For many years he maintained his home in St. Louis and was regarded as one of its most valued citizens. He was born in the county of Gray, Ontario, Canada, November 22, 1860, his parents being Thomas Argo and Sarah (Scott) Robinson, both natives of the north of Ireland. He acquired a common school education in Ontario and in 1872 obtained a position as water boy on the Hamilton Northwestern Railroad of Canada. Later he occupied various railroad positions and also worked in lumber camps in Michigan. In 1882 he took up railroad building as a contractor and was superintendent and manager of the Minnesota & Arizona Construction Company, building railroads and canals in Arizona. From 1898 until 1900 he was superintendent of construction of the Vera Cruz al Pacifico Railroad in Mexico. Through the succeeding two years he engaged in the building of the Arizona & Southwestern Railroad in Arizona and Mexico and in 1902 formed a partnership with MacArthur Brothers for the construction of the Frisco Railroad between St. Louis and Crystal City. They were also engaged in the building of the Little Kanawha Railroad, a...

Biography of George W. Deitzler, Gen.

Gen. George W. Deitzler, one of the famous “treason prisoners” to be taken from Lawrence to Lecompton, afterward prominent in the public affairs of the Territory and State of Kansas and prominent in the Civil war, was born at Pine Grove, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, November 30, 1826. He received a common school edncation and removed to Kansas, where he became one of the prominent figures of the free-state party. He was a delegate to the Topeka convention, and in May, 1856, was one of the seven men who were arrested at Lawrence and taken to Lecompton under guard of Federal troops. They were known as the “treason prisoners” and were kept in a prison camp for several months. During the winter of 1857-58 he was a member and speaker of the Kansas House of Representatives and was re-elected. Subsequently he was elected mayor of Lawrence, and also served as treasurer of the State University. At the outbreak of the Civil war he was made colonel of the First Kansas; was seriously wounded at the battle of Wilson’s Creek, in August, 1861, and never entirely recovered. He remained in the service, however, was promoted to brigadier general, but resigned in 1863. During Price’s raid he rendered great service in protecting the border. In 1864 he was commissioned major general of Kansas militia. General Deitzler was killed by being thrown from a carriage at Tucson, Arizona, April 11,...

Arizona WW2 NMCG Casualty List – A Surnames

ABAD, Basil Martinez, Radioman 2c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Basilio Abad, 4103 Highland Ave., Miami. ALLEN, Lonnie, Seaman 2c, USNR. Daughter, Miss Alberta Allen, Gen. Del., San Carlos. ALLISON, Robert E., Pfc., USMCR. Mother, Mrs. Bertha Juan, c/o Salt River Day School, Scottsdale. ANDERSEN, Wesley W., Sgt., USMC. Wife, Mrs. Wesley W. Andersen, Box 216, Litchfield Park. ANDERSON, Truman Green, Chief Electrician’s Mate, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Monroe Anderson, Route 1, Box 129-D, Tolleson. ARNEY, Buford Young, Seaman 2c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ben R. Arney, Box 415, Florence. ASHLEY, Felix, Watertender 3c, USNR. Mrs. Pearl Moore Ashley, Fort Defiance. ASKEW, Earl Miles Robertson, Chief Quartermaster, USN. Wife, Mrs. Ola May Askew, c/o Gen. Del.,...

Arizona WW2 NMCG Casualty List – B Surnames

BACA, Jose, Pharmacist’s Mate 3c, USNR. Mother, Mrs. Felipa Torres Baca, Box 224, Florence. BAILEY, Harry F., Sgt., USMCR. Mother, Mrs. Esther Bailey, 806 W. Fleming St., Winslow. BAILEY, John Billy, Torpedoman’s Mate 3c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur J. Bailey, c/o Givens Bros. Shoe Store, Bisbee. BAKER, Lester Leroy, Torpedoman 1c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. George W. Baker, 1648 E. 9th St., Tucson. BASDEN, Orval, Seaman 1c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Isabel Basden, 225 No. 7th St., Phoenix. BECK, Harold Henry, Sgt., USMCR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Beck, 108 W. Almeria Ave., Phoenix. BEGAY, Paul, Pfc., USMCR. Father, Mr. Hubert B. Begay, Gen. Del., Denahatso, Kayenta. BELL, Robert Edwin, Seaman 2c, USN. Father, Mr. George Bell, 1136 5th St., Douglas. BENNETT, James L., Cpl., USMC. Mother, Mrs. Ruth E. Bennett, Route 1, Box 765, Phoenix. BERTIE, George Allan, Jr., Seaman 2c, USN. Father, Mr. G. A. Bertie, 721¼ E. Portland St., Phoenix. BIYE, Walter Key, Aviation Ordnanceman 2c, USNR. Guardian, Mr. Keith Tully, Fort Defiance. BLACK, Billy M., Pfc., USMCR. Mother, Mrs. Lettie V. Black, Box 24, Tiger. BLAIR, Allison H., Field Music 1c, USMC. Father, Mr. Albert Blair, Route 1, Somerton. BOGLE, William Blythe, Ensign, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Bogle, 1315 N. Highland Ave., Tucson. BOOZER, Edward LeRoy, Cpl., USMC. Mother, Mrs. Lily Boozer, Central Hotel,...

Arizona WW2 NMCG Casualty List – E Surnames

EARL, Thayer Wade, Seaman 2c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Rossell Hubert Earl, 702 No. 5th St., Phoenix. EDWARDS, William Alessandro, Lt., (jg), USNR. Sister, Amy Virginia Edwards, Sedona. EIKNER, James C., Jr., 1st Lt., USMCR. Wife, Mrs. James C. Eikner, Jr., Box 1348, Hayden. ENNEFER, Paul Raymond, Fireman 1c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Paul Wm. Ennefer, Route 1, Box 359, Mesa. ESCALANTE, Antonio Portugal, Pfc., USMCR. Wife, Mrs. Nellie O. Escalante, Box 1035, Superior. ESCALANTE, Cipriano R., Pfc., USMCR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Manuel G. Escalante, Box 315, Tempe. ESHELMAN, John William, Machinist’s Mate 1c, USN. Father, Mr. Irvin H. Eshelman, Cave Creek. ESTES, Rex G., Pfc., USMC. Father, Mr. James R. Estes, 362 No. 16th St., Phoenix. EUSTACE, Milton Jack, Machinist’s Mate 2c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lester Edward Eustace, 267 Orange Ave.,...

Arizona WW2 NMCG Casualty List – K Surnames

KEENAN, John Frederick, Seaman 1c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Isabel Keenan, 1546 Clark Ave., Tucson. KEITH, George Richard, Radioman 3c, USN. Mother, Mrs. Ethel R. Gardine, Rt. No. 9, Box No. 719, Phoenix. KEMPE, Jack Loren, Pfc., USMC. Father, Mr. Otto J. Kempe, Box No. 755, St. Johns. KENDALL, Leonard Forest Jay, Seaman 2c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Earl Kendall, P. O. Box 183, Casa Grande. KENNEDY, Dale W., Pfc., USMCR. Sister, Mrs. Margaret K. Phillips, Route 1, Box 893, Phoenix. KEOHEN, James F., Pfc., USMC. Mother, Mrs. Helen C. Keohen, 722 No. 7th St., Phoenix. KING, Arthur Godwyn, Jr., Lt. (jg), USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Godwyn King, Sr., The King Ranch, R. F. D. No. 1, Buckeye. KINSER, John A., Pvt., USMCR. Mother, Mrs. Lula M. Kinser, Route 1, Box 1, Casa Grande. KIRK, Leo, Pvt., USMCR. Wife, Mrs. Hazel Kirk, Gen. Del., Ganado. KNIGHT, John J., Jr., 1st Lt., USMCR. Mother, Mrs. Josephine E. Knight, P. O. Box No. 1852, Phoenix. KNIGHT, Lester, Pfc., USMCR. Mother, Mrs. Nettie Knight, Route 2, Box 600,...

Arizona WW2 NMCG Casualty List – L Surnames

LAMB, Nash Larue, Seaman 1c, USNR. Mother, Mrs. Bedia Drucilla Lamb, 1314 East Hess St., Phoenix. LAMBERT, Lester Lee, Seaman 2c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Louis E. Lambert, Box 982, Kingman. LARGO, Phillip Dean, Aviation Radioman 3c, USNR. Mother, Mrs. Sarah Largo French, 1301 E. Van Buren, Phoenix. LARSON, Corwin T., 1st Lt., USMCR. Mother, Mrs. Augusta T. Larson, Lakeside. LASSITER, Eugene Quay, Fireman 2c, USNR. Mother, Mrs. Easther Sylvia Lassiter, Box 1101, Coolidge. LENZ, Paul Dunbar, Machinist’s Mate, 1c, USN. Father, Mr. Paul Charles Lenz, 2530 No. Stone Ave., Tucson. LERMA, Eugene Samaniego, Cpl., USMC. Wife, Mrs. Alicia M. Lerma, P. O. Box No. 323, Elroy. LEWIS, Kenneth L., Pfc., USMC. Aunt, Mrs. Minnie McGee, Liberty. LEWIS, Richard C., Jr., Cpl., USMCR. Brother, Mr. Roe B. Lewis, Route 1, Box 28, Laveen. LOGES, Walter Wallace, Seaman 1c, USN. Father, Mr. Herman E. Loges, Route 9, Box 80, Phoenix. LOPEZ, Manuel R., Cpl., USMCR. Mother, Mrs. Marguirita R. Lopez, 922 So. Tyndall Ave., Tucson. LOWELL, Hervey W., 2nd Lt., USMCR. Father, Mr. Arthur C. Lowell, Route 5, Box 625, Tucson. LOWREY, David Crockett, Jr., Motor Machinist’s Mate 3c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Clara Valeria Lowrey, 124 So. Beaver, Flagstaff. LUCIO, Gregorio, Pvt., USMCR. Mother, Mrs. Thomasa L. Espinoza, Box 176, Morenci. LUNGERSHAUSEN, John Frank, Ensign, USNR. Mother, Mrs. Mary Barbara Steele, 403 G. Alzona Park, Phoenix. LYNCH, Floyd A., 2nd Lt., USMCR. Father, Major E. H. Lynch, USArmy Usual address: 1622 No. 11th St.,...
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