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World War 2 Casualties

This collection lists War Department casualties (Army and Army Air Force personnel) from World War II. Information provided includes serial number, rank and type of casualty. The birthplace or residence of the deceased is not indicated. An introduction explaining how the list was compiled, a statistical tabulation, and the descriptions of the types of casualties incurred are also included.

The Indian Races of North and South America

The Indian Races of North and South America provides ethnographic information (manners, peculiarities and history) on the tribes of North and South America. We’ve added pictures to the mix, to provide some sort of visual reference for the reader. This is an important addition to AccessGenealogy’s collection for it’s inclusion of tribes in South America and Central America, as well as the Caribbean Islands.

World War 2 Casualties – Navy, Marines, Coast Guard

Inclusion of names in the World War 2 Casualty Lists has been determined solely by the residence of next of kin at the time of notification of the last wartime casualty status. This listing does not necessarily represent the State of birth, legal residence, or official State credit according to service enlistment. Casualties listed represent only those on active duty in the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard, resulting directly from enemy action or from operational activities against the enemy in war zones from December 7, 1941, to the end of the war. Casualties in the United States area or as a result of disease, homicide or suicide in any location is not included. This is a state summary taken from casualty lists released by the Navy Department, corrected as to the most recent casualty status and recorded residence of next of kin. Personnel listed as MISSING are under continuous investigation by the Navy Department, and therefore will be officially presumed or determined dead. Some will be found alive. The last official notice to next of kin will take precedence over this list. Compiled, February 1946 Navy – Marines – Coast Guard Alabama World War 2 NMCG Casualty List Alaska World War 2 NMCG Casualty List Arizona World War 2 NMCG Casualty List Arkansas World War 2 NMCG Casualty List California World War 2 NMCG Casualty List Colorado World War 2 NMCG Casualty List Connecticut World War 2 NMCG Casualty List Delaware World War 2 NMCG Casualty List District of Columbia World War 2 NMCG Casualty List Florida World War 2 NMCG Casualty List Georgia World War 2...

Philadelphia To Steubenville

Monday, Oct. 4, 1819.–Dr. Hall and myself left Philadelphia at 1 o’clock p. m. after taking an affectionate leave of friends and acquaintances. Fair and pleasant weather, and the roads very fine in consequence of a refreshing shower of rain which fell on the night previous to our setting out. After traveling twenty-two miles and passing some rich and well-cultivated farms we arrived at West Chester at 7 o’clock. West Chester contains about 600 inhabitants, several places of worship, a gaol, etc., etc. A man named Downey is confined in the gaol of this place for debt. He was once in affluence, but from misfortunes and some imprudence he became reduced in circumstances. During his confinement he determined to starve himself to death, and for seven days had refused nourishment of every description. Even the clergy waited on him and endeavored to dissuade him from his rash determination, offering him food of different kinds, but all without avail. He was able to stand. No doubt one or two more days will end his troubles. How long, O my country, will your cheeks continue to be crimsoned by the blush that must follow the plunging an innocent and unfortunate being, a debtor, in a dungeon, amongst murderers and cut-throats? Tuesday, Oct. 5.–Left West Chester at 7 o’clock a. m. Traveled a rough road. Passed some travelers on foot migrating to the west who were able to keep pace with us for a considerable distance. Breakfasted with an old Dutchman who, for unpolished manners and even a want of common politeness, surpassed in expectation even the wild men of Illinois. He...

Through Ohio And Kentucky

Sunday, Oct. 18.–Myself and friend proceeded on our journey. We arrived at Siers, a distance of thirty miles, at dusk, much relieved by the change from our horses to the wagon. The roads were muddy, the weather drizzly and the country hilly. Buildings indifferent. The land very fertile and black. Trees uncommonly tall. Passed the little village of Cadis. In this country a tavern, a store, a smith shop and two or three cabins make a town. Passed ten or fifteen travelers. Great contrast between the quality of the land from Chambersburg to Pittsburg, and that which we have already traveled over from Steubenville in Ohio. Monday, Oct. 19.–Left Siers at 6 o’clock a. m. The morning fair and cold. Roads extremely rough. Country fertile, but hilly. Log cabins, ugly women and tall timber. Passed a little flourishing village called Freeport, settled by foreigners. Yankee Quakers and mechanics. Remarkable, with two taverns in the village, there was nothing fit to drink, not even good water. The corn fields in the woods among dead trees and the corn very fine. We arrived at Adairs, a distance of twenty-seven miles, at 6 o’clock p. m. Passed some peddlers and a few travelers. Value of land from Steubenville to Adairs from $2 to $30 per acre. Lots in Freeport, eighteen months old, from $30 to $100. This day being Monday and the end of the second week since leaving home, our feelings were warm and our hearts beat high for those that are dear and behind us. Tuesday, Oct. 20.–Left Adairs at 6 o’clock a. m. The country extremely hilly and not...

A Brotherhood Of Cutthroats

Wednesday, Nov. 3, 1819.–Left Miller’s tavern at 7 o’clock and arrived at Squire Chambers’ at 6 o’clock, after traveling a distance of thirty-six miles. Passed a trifling village, Fredericksburg; also Greenville. A poor, barren, deserted country. For ten miles, stony, poor, mountainous and naked. Land a little better. Miserable huts, poor accommodations, cabin taverns, and high charges. Crossed Blue river. Every man his own hostler and steward. Plenty of game–deer, turkeys, etc. Inhabitants generally possess a smaller share of politeness than any met with before. Thursday, Nov. 4.–Left Squire Chambers’ (who is only member of the assembly, by the by) at 7 o’clock a. m. Arrived at Lewis’ at 6 o’clock, a distance of twenty-five miles. Passed a little village called Peola. The fact that this part of Indiana is a late purchase by the United States, accounts for its towns being so inconsiderable and being made up of log houses. The lands here are very fertile, the country mountainous and broken. Traveled twenty-five miles through woods and passed but four houses. With great difficulty obtained water for our horses. In the midst of one of those long and thick pieces of woods, we passed one of the most miserable huts ever seen–a house built out of slabs without a nail; the pieces merely laid against a log pen such as pigs are commonly kept in, a dirt floor, no chimney. Indeed, the covering would be a bad one in the heat of summer, and, unfortunately, the weather at this time is very severe for the season of the year. This small cabin contained a young and interesting female...

Escape From The Robber Band

Monday, Nov. 8, 1819.–The disappointment experienced from the unmanly conduct of Dr. Hill had a happy effect on our little company. It bound us more firmly and nearer together, and, I may add with truth, almost fitted us for the field of battle. The hour of 9 o’clock had now arrived, the night uncommonly dark and cloudy. On our going into the house one of the strangers went into the yard and gave the Indian warwhoop three times very loud. About 10 o’clock they took their six rifles, went into the yard with a candle and shot them off one by one, snuffing the candle at forty yards every shot. They then loaded afresh, primed and picked their flints. A large horn was then taken from the loft and blown distinctly three times very loud. All those signals (which we had been told of) brought no more of the company. They then dispatched two of their own party, who were gone until 12 o’clock. They stated to their comrades “they could not be had.” It may be readily imagined, after what we had overhead, seeing such preparations and observing many of their private signals, being warned of our danger previous to stopping at the house, together with the recent and cruel murders which had been committed, in a strange country, where every man made and executed his own law to suit himself–I say it cannot be a matter of wonder that our situation began to put on a character of the most unpleasant kind. However, we were well armed, having pistols, dirks, knives and a gun, and were determined,...

In Possession Of The “Promised Land”

Monday, Nov. 22, 1819.–This day breakfasted with Mr. R. Morrison and dined with Mr. W. Morrison. These gentlemen are wealthy and live in very comfortable style. Mrs. R. Morrison is one of the most intelligent women that I have conversed with, and possesses a lady’s privilege, while Mrs. W. Morrison might rank, in point of beauty with some of the belles of Philadelphia. Dr. Hill having accomplished his business, we set out from Kaskia at 2 o’clock, after bidding a friendly farewell to many new friends made in this place. I must confess I found a few possessing so much more merit than I anticipated that I parted with them reluctantly. Traveled twelve miles, and arrived at Mme. LeCount’s. We supped with a tableful of French. Not one of them could speak English. Pumpkins, spoiled venison and rancid, oily butter for supper, added to the odor of a few ‘coons and opossums that were ripening in the sun, induced us to cut our comfort short. During the night I was taken ill with rheumatism. Bled myself largely. Set out at 6 o’clock in the morning rather better, though dull. Passed some small lakes full of ducks and geese. Saw seven deer, some wild turkeys and other game. Retraced our former steps. Passed Cahokia, a small and unimproving village, and arrived at the town of Illinois at 7 o’clock p. m. Wednesday, Nov. 24.–Crossed over to St. Louis to inquire for old friends or acquaintances from Philadelphia. Even an enemy would have been taken by the hand, but to my disappointment there was no arrival. Recrossed the Mississippi, and set...

American Baker Genealogies

The following page consists of short genealogies of American Baker families. Genealogy of Daniel Baker Genealogy of Eber Baker of Marion Ohio Genealogy of Edward Baker of Saugus Massachusetts Genealogy of Edward D. Baker of Salem Massachusetts Genealogy of Elleazer Baker of Dutchess County NY Genealogy of George Baker of Pownal Vermont Genealogy of Howard Baker of Solon Maine Genealogy of Joseph Baker of Marshfield Massachusetts Genealogy of Nicholas Baker of Scituate Massachusetts Genealogy of Thomas Baker of East Hampton Connecticut Genealogy of Alexander Baker L156 ALEXANDER BAKER: b. 1607; d. ?; came to America in 1635 and settled in Boston. Later the family moved to Conn. L157. JOSHUA BAKER: b. 1642; d. 1717; m. Hannah Minturn. L158. JOSHUA BAKER: b. 1677; d. 1740; m. Marion Hurburt. L159 JOSHUA BAKER: b. 1706; d. 1770; m. Phoebe Wilkwire. L160 JARED BAKER: b. 1746; d. 1822; m. Phoebe Harris. L161 ANIEL BAKER: b. 1770; d. 1851; m. Sarah Raymond. L162 DANIEL ALBERT: b. 1810; m. Harriet Vander Cook; moved to Ohio. Daniel Albert: m. Arabella Benson. Annie Louise: b. 1870; m. Charles Pearsall. Charles. Marion; m. Emerson Goodrich. Arabella; b. 1920. Joeleen; b. 1923. James. Isabel; m. John Fike. Amos. Anna L. Marion S.: b. 1872; d. 1927; m. Dr. Eugene Beodles. Howell N.: b. 1877; m. 1907 to Maude Jessup. Carolyn S.: b. 1909. Howell North; b. 1910. George R.: b. 1884; m. Marie Behin. George R.: b. 1910. A. Read; b. 1882; m. Ion Hayward. Mayme: b. 1914. John R.: b. 1916. Katherine: b. 1918. George R.: m. Celia Ashmun. Ch.: Frederick A., Harry C., Charles, Katherine. Annie Louise;...

United States Courthouse Addresses

The following collection references all know United States courthouse addresses. Courthouses remain a great source of genealogical data for most communities. County courthouses often hold records back to the beginning of the county for such things as marriage, divorce, criminal, probate, naturalization, and other records critical to genealogy research. The following information provides a state by state, county by county, listing of all addresses for all county courthouses including links to the county website if available and known to us. If we’ve missed one or if the information for one has changed, please submit a comment or use the Contact us at the top of the page. Alabama County Courthouse Addresses Alaska County Courthouse Addresses Arizona County Courthouse Addresses California County Courthouse Addresses Colorado County Courthouse Addresses Connecticut County Courthouse Addresses Delaware County Courthouse Addresses Florida County Courthouse Addresses Georgia County Courthouse Addresses Hawaii County Courthouse Addresses Idaho County Courthouse Addresses Illinois County Courthouse Addresses Indiana County Courthouse Addresses Iowa County Courthouse Addresses Iowa County Courthouse Addresses Kansas County Courthouse Addresses Kentucky County Courthouse Addresses Louisiana Parish Courthouse Addresses Maine County Courthouse Addresses Maryland County Courthouse Addresses Massachusetts County Courthouse Addresses Michigan County Courthouse Addresses Minnesota County Courthouse Addresses Mississippi County Courthouse Addresses Missouri County Courthouse Addresses Montana County Courthouse Addresses Nebraska County Courthouse Addresses Nevada County Courthouse Addresses New Hampshire County Courthouse Addresses New Mexico County Courthouse Addresses New York County Courthouse Addresses North Carolina County Courthouse Addresses North Dakota County Courthouse Addresses Ohio County Courthouse Addresses Oklahoma County Courthouse Addresses Oregon County Courthouse Addresses Pennsylvania County Courthouse Addresses Rhode Island County Courthouse Addresses South Dakota County Courthouse Addresses...
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