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Battle of Burnt Corn

Peter McQueen, at the head of the Tallase warriors; High Head Jim, with the Autaugas, and Josiah Francis, with the Alabamas, numbering in all three hundred and fifty, departed for Pensacola with many pack-horses. On their way they beat and drove off all the Indians who would not take the war talk. The brutal McQueen beat an unoffending white trader within an inch of his life, and carried the wife of Curnells, the government interpreter, a prisoner to Pensacola. The village of Hatchechubba was reduced to ashes. The inhabitants of the Tombigby and the Tensaw had constantly petitioned the governor for an army to repel the Creeks, whose attacks they hourly expected. But General Flournoy, who had succeeded Wilkinson in command, refused to send any of the regular or volunteer troops. The British fleet was seen off the coast, from which supplies, arms, ammunition and Indian emissaries were sent to Pensacola and other Spanish ports in Florida. Everything foreboded the extermination of the Americans in Alabama, who were the most isolated and defenseless people imaginable. Determined, however, to protect themselves to the best of their means and abilities, they first sent spies to Pensacola to watch the movements of the Indians there under McQueen, who returned with the report that the British agents were distributing to them ample munitions of war. Colonel James Caller ordered out the militia, some of whom soon rallied to his standard in the character of minute volunteers. He marched across the Tombigby, passed through the town of Jackson, and by the new fort upon the eastern line of Clarke, and from thence to Sisemore’s...

Battles of Tallasehatche, Talladega and Auttose

The arrival of an express at Nashville, with letters from Mr. George S. Gaines to General Jackson and the governor, conveying the distressing intelligence of the massacre at Fort Mims, and imploring their assistance, created great excitement, and the Tennesseans volunteered their services to avenge the outrage. General Jackson, at the head of a large force, passed through Huntsville, crossed the Tennessee at Ditto’s Landing, and joined Colonel Coffee, who had been dispatched in advance, and who had encamped opposite the upper end of an island on the south side of the river, three miles above the landing. Remaining here a short time, the army advanced higher up, to Thompson’s Creek, to meet supplies, which had been ordered down from East Tennessee. In the meantime, Colonel Coffee marched, with six hundred horse, to Black Warrior’s town, upon the river of that name, a hundred miles distant, which he destroyed by fire, having found it abandoned. Collecting about three hundred bushels of corn, he rejoined the main army at Thompson’s Creek, without having seen an Indian. Establishing a defensive depot at this place, called Fort Deposite, Jackson, with great difficulty, cut his way over the mountains to Wills’ Creek, where, being out of bread, he encamped several days, to allow his foraging parties to collect provisions. The contractors had entirely failed to meet their engagements, and his army had for some days been in a perishing condition. Jackson dispatched Colonel Dyer, with two hundred cavalry, to attack the village of Littefutchee, situated at the head of Canoe Creek, twenty miles distant. They arrived there at four o’clock in the morning,...

Battle of the Horseshoe

Leaving a guard at Fort Williams, General Jackson put his army, which consisted of two thousand men, upon the march. He opened a passage across the ridge which divides the Coosa and Tallapoosa, and, in three days advanced to the immediate neighborhood of the enemy. Cholocco Litabixee, the Horse-Shoe, where the Red Sticks had assembled to make a desperate defense, was admirably adapted by nature for security if well guarded, but equally for destruction if not well defended. About one hundred acres of land was bordered by the Tallapoosa River, forming a peninsula. Across the neck of the bend, the Red Sticks had a breastwork of logs, so arranged as to expose assailants to a crossfire. The houses of the village stood upon some low grounds at the bottom of the bend, where hundreds of canoes were tied to the banks of the river. The warriors of Hillabee, Ocfuske, Oakchoie, Eufaulahatche, New Yauca, Hickory Ground and Fish Pond towns had concentrated upon the remarkable peninsula. General Coffee, with a large body of mounted men, and the friendly Indians, forded the Tallapoosa two miles below the breast-work, and, having gained the eastern side, extended his lines for a great distance, so as to encompass the bend. Morning of. As soon as Jackson saw, from signals which were made, that Coffee had taken his position, he marched the remainder of his force towards the breast-work, planted two pieces of artillery, eighty yards distant from the nearest part of the Indian defense, and, at ten o’clock in the morning, began to open them upon the enemy. These pieces, accompanied by occasional discharges...

Parsons and Abbott Roll

By a treaty of March 24, 1832, the Creek Tribe ceded to the United States all of their land east of the Mississippi River. Heads of families were entitled to tracts of land, which, if possible, were to include their improvements. In 1833 Benjamin S. Parsons and Thomas J. Abbott prepared a census of Creek Indian heads of families, which gave their names and the number of males, females, and slaves in each family. The entries were arranged by town and numbered; these numbers were used for identification in later records. The genealogical researcher who is able to locate an ancestor on this document is most fortunate, as it forms the basis for many other documents relating to Creek claims cases through the 1960’s.

1832 Creek Census – Ufaula Town

By a treaty of March 24, 1832, the Creek Indians ceded to the United States all of their land east of the Mississippi River. Heads of families were entitled to tracts of land, which, if possible, were to include their improvements. In 1833 Benjamin S. Parsons and Thomas J. Abbott prepared a census of Creek Indian heads of families, which gave their names and the number of males, females, and slaves in each family. The entries were arranged by town and numbered; these numbers were used for identification in later records. This is the census for the town of Ufaula. TownNumberHeadMalesFemalesSlavesTotalRemarks Ufaula1Lot te Yo ho lo2204 Ufaula2Tus ta mey Har go3205 Ufaula3Tus sic kie Har go2103 Ufaula4Skin is so go1203 Ufaula5Tylar2406 Ufaula6Ar bic ca1304 Ufaula7Sally Townsend2204 Ufaula8Dannel Townsend2204 Ufaula9Chis Sa Har go1708 Ufaula10Hin ne har1304 Ufaula11Spoak oak Micco3407 Ufaula12Micco chopco3104 Ufaula13Ne haw loc co Har go3104 Ufaula14Fix i co Har go2103 Ufaula15Con char ta Emarthla1102 Ufaula16In ne har Fix i co3104 Ufaula17Ar loc Yo ho lo2103 Ufaula18Ath lon Har go1102 Ufaula19Lit ki ti ga1102 Ufaula20Benny3205 Ufaula21Un dul Har go2103 Ufaula22Micco cho ho co noce3104 Ufaula23Yar both ta2204 Ufaula24Il le ga by2103 Ufaula25Ni oak Kie44210 Ufaula26Al but tu che3104 Ufaula27Daniel G. Watson1102 Ufaula28Coosar Micco2103 Ufaula29John1102 Ufaula30Ose nub bar Har go1203 Ufaula31John Smith55010 Ufaula32Mista Hoga1203 Ufaula33Tal lipYo ho lo1102 Ufawla33Yo ho lo Micco1124principal chief Ufaula34No ko cil le1405 Ufawla34Oc ti ar che Micco2507principal chief Ufaula35Chu Yo ho lo2204 Ufaula36Al bud dar Har go3104 Ufaula37Tuck a batch a Hago1203 Ufaula38Is tal loch er1102 Ufaula39Choc ca ligar2204 Ufaula40Oche Har go2103 Ufaula41Sar war noak Har go1203 Ufaula43Par Fos li ga2103 Ufaula44Charley2204 Ufaula45Cho e gar...

1832 Creek Census – Tuskeega Town

By a treaty of March 24, 1832, the Creek Indians ceded to the United States all of their land east of the Mississippi River. Heads of families were entitled to tracts of land, which, if possible, were to include their improvements. In 1833 Benjamin S. Parsons and Thomas J. Abbott prepared a census of Creek Indian heads of families, which gave their names and the number of males, females, and slaves in each family. The entries were arranged by town and numbered; these numbers were used for identification in later records. This is the census for the town of Tuskeega. TownNumberHeadMalesFemalesSlavesTotalRemarks Tuskeega1Hillubba Har go2103 Tuskeega10Samuel Manack2103 Tuskeega11Emathlar2204 Tuskeega12Chu loc co Har go4206 Tuskeega13Oc tiache E marth lar2002 Tuskeega14Ho tulga E marth lar2204 Tuskeega15Ko nip E marth lar3205 Tuskeega16Cas see tar Har go2204 Tuskeega17Cock che Yo ho lo1304 Tuskeega18Tal low war Har go1405 Tuskeega19Coo sa Fix i co3238 Tuskeega2Ne har Micco2103 Tuskeega20Echo Fix i co1304 Tuskeega21Micco Hatka321318 Tuskeega22Joseph Goowin1203 Tuskeega23James McGilvary1203 Tuskeega24Cole mie Tustanugga1102 Tuskeega25O co ie hoo che1304 Tuskeega26Oc tiarch Har go1102 Tuskeega27Char che Yo ho lo1102 Tuskeega28Lewis Manack3205 Tuskeega29No kos Fix i co1304 Tuskeega3Ottis Har go221721 Tuskeega30Echo Har go1102 Tuskeega31Ko nip Har go1203 Tuskeega32Tin than nis Har go3205 Tuskeega33MiccoYo ho lo2305 Tuskeega34Micco Har go2103 Tuskeega35Car wor bie1203 Tuskeega36Oack chon Har go2002 Tuskeega37Billy1102 Tuskeega38Dick1102 Tuskeega39Francis1101 Tuskeega4No ko se E marth lar1102 Tuskeega40Sandy1102 Tuskeega41McIntosh1102 Tuskeega42Sister1102 Tuskeega43Tar war hie2204 Tuskeega44Sar nar hie1102 Tuskeega45Sally Carr0224 Tuskeega46Cho co lar ga0202 Tuskeega47Sut ho yie1102 Tuskeega48Tar war sick kie1102 Tuskeega49Nancy0202 Tuskeega5Osir Har go2406 Tuskeega50War nar hie ya0202 Tuskeega51Lit ton ho ee ka??1203 Tuskeega52Tim mi tee che0404 Tuskeega53Nelly0202 Tuskeega54Moseley0202 Tuskeega55Dick12032nd of same name Tuskeega56Thla nar kie1102...

Wilcox County Alabama Marriage Records

The following information details the Wilcox County Alabama Marriage Records available online. Hosted at Alabama GenWeb Archives Wilcox County Marriages to 1825 Miscellaneous Marriage Records Marriage Record of Henry Boutwell & Ellen Luke Grimes Marriages in Alabama, 1821 – 1934 Hosted at Ancestry.com $ Alabama Marriages, 1809-1920 $ This database is a collection of marriage records from the state between 1809 and 1920. Researchers will find the names of both bride and groom along with the marriage date. Wilcox, 1866-1900 Alabama Marriages, 1800-1969 $ Alabama marriage information taken from county courthouse records. Many of these records were extracted from copies of the original records in microfilm, microfiche, or book format, located at the Family History Library Wilcox, 1805, 1820-1825,...

Tallapoosa County Alabama Marriage Records

The following information details the Tallapoosa County Alabama Marriage Records available online. Hosted at Alabama GenWeb Archives Tallapoosa County Marriages by Bride Surnames A – C Tallapoosa County Marriages by Bride Surnames D – H Tallapoosa County Marriages by Bride Surnames I – M Tallapoosa County Marriages by Bride Surnames N – R Tallapoosa County Marriages by Bride Surnames S – Z Tallapoosa County Marriages by Groom Surnames A – C Tallapoosa County Marriages by Groom Surnames D – H Tallapoosa County Marriages by Groom Surnames I – M Tallapoosa County Marriages by Groom Surnames N – R Tallapoosa County Marriages by Groom Surnames S – Z Some Early Marriages in Tallapoosa County Miscellaneous Marriages in Tallapoosa County Adams, Sarah H. – James H. Beard 1857 Baggett, Elizabeth – McGlon, Henry 1853 Baker, Catherine – Scott, B. F. 1864 Berry, Frances Sarah Ann – Samuel M. Henderson 1841 Brewer, Narcissa J. – Tillman S. Simmons 1866 Brooks, Martha – Farrow, James A. 1853 Burnett, Emeline – Harris, William D. 1865 Burnett, Mary – Patterson, Clark 1852 Carl, Margaret J. – Lauderdale, Andrew J. 1885 Carter, Annie – Trent, P. G. March 1885 Carter, Mary A. – Luke, Joseph D. 1839 Cleveland, James M. – Emmeline Baker 1867 Couch, Martha – Ray, George M. 1851 Couch, Meary P – Couch, Thomas P 1868 Crouch, Rosey E. – Ray, Ransom G. 1852 Crouch, Susan – Ray, William 1845 Crouch, Susannah – Ray, William 1845 Davis, marriages Tallapoosa Co. 1835 – 1863 Davis, Matilda – Carter, James J. December 2, 1846 Edwards, Marriages in Tallapoosa Fuller, Exa Pearl – McLellan, Ernest A....

Shelby County Alabama Marriage Records

The following information details the Shelby County Alabama Marriage Records available online. Hosted at Alabama GenWeb Archives Shelby County Marriages to 1825 Marriage Records, 1824-1850, Brides Marriage Records, 1824-1850, Grooms Marriage Records, 1849-1859, Brides Marriage Records, 1849-1859, Grooms Marriage Records, 1859-1867, Brides Marriage Records, 1859-1867, Grooms Marriage Records, 1860-1869, Brides Marriage Records, 1860-1869, Grooms Marriage Records, 1891 – 1896, Brides Marriage Records, 1891 – 1896, Grooms Marriage Records, 1896 – 1899, Brides Marriage Records, 1896 – 1899, Grooms Assorted Shelby County Marriages 1841- 1937 Hosted at Shelby County ALGenWeb (Shelby County Alabama Historical Society) Early Shelby County Alabama Marriages – Not in the Marriage Record Books. Marriages by Rev. Marion Walker Jones – Alpha by Groom. 1824-1850 Shelby County Alabama Marriage Index 1849-1859 Shelby County Alabama Marriage Index 1859-1867 Shelby County Alabama Marriage Index 1860-1869 Shelby County Alabama Marriage Index 1869-1885 Shelby County Alabama Marriage Index 1885-1891 Shelby County Alabama Marriage Index 1891-1896 Shelby County Alabama Marriage Index 1896-1899 Shelby County Alabama Marriage Index 1900-1905 Shelby County Alabama Marriage Index 1904-1906 Shelby County Alabama Marriage Index 1907-1911 Shelby County Alabama Marriage Index 1911-1915 Shelby County Alabama Marriage Index 1914-1919 Shelby County Alabama Marriage Index 1919-1923 Shelby County Alabama Marriage Index 1923-1927 Shelby County Alabama Marriage Index 1927-1930 Shelby County Alabama Marriage Index 1930-1932 Shelby County Alabama Marriage Index 1932-1934 Shelby County Alabama Marriage Index 1934-1935 Shelby County Alabama Marriage Index 1935-1936 Shelby County Alabama Marriage Index Hosted at Tracking Your Roots Shelby County Marriages 1818 – 1822 Hosted at Ancestry.com $ Alabama Marriages, 1809-1920 $ This database is a collection of marriage records from the state between 1809 and...

Pike County Alabama Marriage Records

The following information details the Pike County Alabama Marriage Records available online. Hosted at Alabama GenWeb Archives Miscellaneous Marriages Adams, Eliza Ann – Williams, Simon Adams, Loueza – Williams, Simeon Adams, Mary L. – Fortune, Asberry 1900 Allen, Caroline – Urquhart, Norman (Montgomery Co.) Allen, E. C. – Boutwell, J. M. February 12, 1885 Anderson, Marriages in Pike County Barnett, Louisa – Urquhart, Alexander Bass, Bell – Lee, John A. 1885 Bass, Bell – Lee, John A. May 21, 1885 Bass, Mary Jane -Renfroe, Enoch 1865 Black, Surname Marriages in Pike Co. Boutwell, Mary – Fortune, Elijah 1861 Brockman, Pamelia H. – Mullins, Thomas K. 1830 Carrol, Ann & Hollis, Solomon Marriage License 1865 Collins, Leila – Fortune, Abner 1902 Cribb, Molsa – Fortune, Richard 1856 Dawkins, F. L. – Carroll, E. E. Dyches, Lydia J – Eddins, W. W. 1878 Ferguson, Francis – Bryant, Henry (Montgomery Co.) Gillerstedt, Mary Elizabeth – Wright, William Harrison 1923 Gilmore, Martha – Brooks, Baily M. Goldson, Mrs. Rebecca A. – Pike, Joshua Grimes Marriages in Alabama 1821 – 1934 Horne, Mary Ann – Williams, James G. Hussey, Daisy Myrtle – Collins, Willis W. Johnston, Mrs. Lucyle Dodson – Kingsley, Philip Franklin 1937 Lord, Miss Nancy P. – Little, Granberry 1856 Mansell/Mancil, Marriages 1835-1931 McLendon, Myrtice – Fortune, Leamon 1936 Russell Co. McDonald, Flora – Williams, Garland Prince, Averilla Adline – Phillips, John 1850 Ranier, Surname Marriages in Pike Co. Shepherd, Martha & Shipman, Lewis Calvin Marriage License 1884 Shield Marriages in Pike County Urquhart, Catherine – Williams, John Allen (Montgomery Co.) Vickers, Mary – Forsin, W. (Montgomery Co.) Williams, Elizabeth – Andrew,...
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