Alabama Revolutionary War Soldiers – H Surnames

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HAGGARD, HENRY, aged 94, resided in Bibb County, June 1. 1840, with James Fancher.-Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 149.

HAGUE, JOHN. From the South Western Christian Advocate, published at Nashville, July 24, 1841.

” ‘AN OLD SOLDIER FALLEN.-Mr. John Hague, aged, (we understand) ninety-three years, died in Nashville, on the 13th inst. Mr. Hague was a native of Germany. He came to America in company with Lafayette, and fought in the Revolutionary War in aid of our country’s independence. He was one of Lafayette’s light guard. When this distinguished chieftain visited America, and passed through Nashville in 1824, Mr. Hague, who then resided in Huntsville, Alabama, came on foot, more than a hundred miles, to meet once more his old General. We are told by those who were present at their meeting, that it was a moment of thrilling interest. Mr. Hague threw himself suddenly and unexpectedly before Lafayette; the General immediately recognized him, and with a familiar tone exclaimed ,’Why, John, is this you!’ and in a moment they were closely embraced in each other’s arms.

” ‘Mr. Hague was for more than fifty years a devoted Christian, and faithful member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

” ‘He died triumphantly. His funeral was attended by an immense concourse. He was buried with military honors.’ “-Independent Monitor, Tuscumbia, Aug. 11, 1841.

The following further reference to this old soldier is noted, evidently taken from some Nashville paper:

“During the visit, short as it was, of Gen. Lafayette to this place [Nashville], many incidents occurred, calculated to touch the feelings and awaken the sensibility of all who witnessed them. From among the number which have been described to us, we select the following :

“An old ‘revolutionaire’ named Hagy, a German by birth, who came to America in the same vessel with Gen. Lafayette, in 1777, and served with him during the greater part of the war, had traveled hither on foot from Huntsville to greet the ‘Nation’s Guest.’ Their meeting under our civic arch was most cordial. Hagy repeatedly embraced and kissed his old commander.”-Southern Advocate, Huntsville, Ala., May 27, 1825.

HALL, WILLIAM, aged 84. and a resident of St. Clair County; private S. C. Militia; enrolled on July 20, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $36.34; sums received to date of publication of list, $90.85.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

HAMILTON, THOMAS. “Thomas Hamilton, one of the five children of David Hamilton and Margaret Carlisle, was born in Belfast, Ireland, April 9, 1758. Their family emigrated to America about 1762, landing in Virginia after a voyage of nearly three months. Upon their arrival, David Hamilton settled in Culpepper County, where he lived with one of his sons. Thomas Hamilton was married on the 28th of May 1782, to Temperance Arnold, daughter of Benjamin Arnold and Ann Hendrick of South Carolina. During the Revolution, Benjamin Arnold, an old man, left South Carolina on account of the troubles resulting from the war, and carried his family for greater safety to Culpepper County, Va., where they became acquainted with Thomas Hamilton. After their marriage in 1782, they returned to the old home of Benjamin Arnold in South Carolina, where they settled upon a place between Andy creek on the east and Horse creek on the west in Greenville district. Here they lived until 1821, when they moved to Butler county, Ala., near Greenville, and remained there until 1826, when they moved to Lowndes county, ten miles south of Benton, where they both died. They are buried in Watkins cemetery, near Collirene, Lowndes County. Thomas died in August 1844, aged 86, and his wife July 22, 1849, aged 87. The spot is marked by a marble obelisk, erected to the memory of the family. The following inscription, with no dates, is among others: ‘Thomas and Temperance Hamilton rest here.’ Thomas Hamilton was with Sumter but not in the regular army. He was at the battles of the Cowpens, Eutaw Springs and King’s Mountain. He was in the brigade commanded by Colonel Campbell at the latter place. After his death in 1844, over sixty years after the Revolutionary war, few of the participants of that mighty struggle were left on earth. The citizens of Lowndes County asked permission to bury him with military honors.” At the age of 81 he resided in Lowndes county, June 1, 1840.-Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 149.-Mrs. P. Mell in the Tranactions of the Alabama Historical Society, Vol. iv, p. 542.

HAMMAN, PHIL. On Saturday, July 3, 1830, the fifty-fifth anniversary of American independence was celebrated at Bellefonte, Jackson County, Alabama, at which among other participants were several Revolutionary patriots. After the reading of the Declaration of Independence by Henry F. Scruggs and the delivery of an oration by Hon. Samuel Moore, the company sat down to a plentiful dinner. After this many patriotic toasts were drunk. Only one, and that because of the historic fact it evoked, is here reproduced :

“By L. James, Esq. ‘Capt. Phil Hamman: The Saviour of Greenbrier-tho’ his history is but little known, his intrepidity and patriotism are not less worthy of our commendation.’

“After the drinking of this toast, the old soldier rose and said: He thanked the gentlemen for introducing his name on an occasion where he had already been too much honored. Tho’ his history was not much known, he could not object to have the transactions of his life divulged to the world. For nine years he had been in the wars of his country-during a greater. part of which he had been engaged in the most dangerous parts of Indian service. He had suffered much; on one occasion he had been stripped by savage rapacity of every vestige of property he possessed, even the clothing of himself and family-one of his children fell a victim to their cruelty. But not to dwell on the dangers he had endured, he would merely speak of the occasion so kindly alluded to in the toast. When stationed at Fort Randolph, at the mouth of the Big Kanawha, nine hundred Indians set off in a body to make an unexpected attack on the inhabitants of Greenbrier, Virginia. Two men were dispatched to apprize the people in that quarter of their approaching danger. In three days they returned, wounded, and in despair; others were sought for who would carry the express; none were found willing to engage in so dangerous and hopeless an undertaking-when he and one John Pryor (who was afterwards killed by the Indians) painted and dressed in Indian garb, set off, and in forty-eight hours traveled one hundred and sixty miles through the wilderness: they overtook the Indians within twelve miles of the white settlements, passed through their camps, and gave timely warning to the people of their impending danger.-Such preparations were made for security and defense as the occasion permitted. About daylight a violent attack was made on Fort Donley; the conflict was desperate-the door of the Fort was broken open-he stood in it, and resisted the enemy-’till it could be shut and fastened. The foes were repelled with great loss, and the country saved from savage barbarity. He said that although he was old and poor, and had not received the compensation promised him by his country, yet he thanked God he was in peace and safety, and could live ‘without the aid of public or private charity.’ He then offered the following sentiment :

” ‘OUR RULERS: May they be just men, fearing God, and hating covetousness.’ “-Southern Advocate, Huntsville, July 10, 1830.

HAMMOND, SAMUEL, aged 88, resided in Sumter County, June 1, 1840.-Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 149.

HANCOCK, ROBERT. “DIED-At his residence, ten miles northwest from Huntsville, on the 15th inst., The Rev. ROBERT HANCOCK, in the 77th year of his age. He was a native of Nottoway County, Virginia. In the year 1790, he emigrated to South Carolina, and from thence in 1811, to his late residence in this county. Mr. Hancock was amiable in his disposition, industrious in his habits, and thereby rendered his family both easy, and happy in their circumstances. He was a true patriot, and during the great revolutionary struggle felt much interest for the safety and welfare of his country, and though disabled by an unavoidable accident to render actual service, he did everything in the compass of his power to pro-mote the cause of liberty. But above all, he was a true friend to religion, and a sincere lover of his God; for 52 years he has been an acceptable member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and for about 30 years a local minister of said church. His talents were respectable, his piety deep, his zeal ardent, his conduct irreproachable, his usefulness extensive; in short, he was a light in a benighted land, and like unto a city set on a hill which cannot be hid,-and now, though he is dead, he will be remembered as one of the church’s brightest ornaments for more than a half a century. His memory will ever be cherished with the fondest recollections by his surviving children, friends, and numerous acquaintances. But he has gone to the house appointed for all the living, yet our loss is his infinite gain; he is not dead, but is only sleeping in Jesus. Such will God bring with Him, therefore we sorrow not as those who have no hope. His last illness was long, and his afflictions severe, yet he evinced the patience and fortitude of a Christian soldier; and notwithstanding his body was worn down by old age and infirmity, his mind in a great degree retained vigor until the last; and with the prospect of eternal life full in view, he calmly sank in the arms of his blessed Jesus. ‘Mark the perfect man, and behold the upright, for the end of that man is peace.’ ‘Let me die the death of the righteous, and let my last end be like his.’ “-Communicated.-The Democrat, Huntsville, Ala., April 21, 1831.

HARDIN, JOSEPH, aged 74, and a resident of Tuscaloosa County; private N. C. Militia; enrolled on October 29, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $26.66; sums received to

HARRIS, HENRY, aged 76, and a resident of Madison county; private Virginia Continental Line; enrolled on March 17, 1819, under act of Congress of March 18, 1818, payment to date from May 22, 1818; annual allowance, $96; sums received to date of publication of list, $1,467.64; transferred from Frederick County, Virginia, from September 4, 1823.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. The following interesting sketch will give further personal details :

[From the Star-Spangled Banner of Oct. 24th.]

“ANOTHER REVOLUTIONARY WORTHY GONE!

“Departed this life on the evening of the 22d instant, at the residence of his son in this place, Mr. HENRY HARRIS, in the 75th year of his age. Mr. HARRIS was a native of Richmond County, Va., and at a very early period of the Revolution en-listed at Fredericksburg (Va.) in Col. Baylor’s Regiment of Dragoons. From the time of his enlistment until the close of the war, he was actively engaged in the service of his country. In most of the important battles that were fought, he bore his share. He was present at the surrender of Burgoyne-at the battles of the Brandywine, the Cowpens, Camden, Gilford and Yorktown. From the time of his retirement from the army until his death, he had lived in the Western and Southwestern States; and throughout a long life sustained the reputation acquired in early youth. It was his glory to think that he had aided in freeing his country from oppression, and it was his fondest boast that he had served under the eye of his great commander WASHINGTON. When stretched upon the bed of weakness and old age he viewed his approaching end with the calmness and fortitude which characterized him when struggling in the deadly combat with the enemies of his country. For some time previous to his death, his mind seemed to dwell upon the incidents of his early life-and it was truly affecting to listen to the old man, and hear him accounting the battles of his youth,

“Shoulder the crutch and show how fields were won.

“It was his dying request that he should be buried with military honors; and accordingly when it was announced that he had ceased to live, the ‘HUNTSVILLE GUARDS’ proceeded to make arrangements for his interment. On yesterday at half past 10, the Guards reached his late residence, and as the pro-cession moved from the house, the ARTILLERY COMPANY under the direction of their public-spirited commander CAPT. LYNES commenced firing minute guns. Thirteen rounds were fired by the time the procession reached the graveyard: here the usual military obsequies were performed by the Guards.

“Here we might pause; for surely it is enough to secure the regret of every American, by simply announcing that the deceased was a soldier of the Revolution; but justice to his memory requires of us to say, that as a man, he lived respected and died lamented by all who knew him.”-Southern Advocate, Huntsville, Oct. 29, 1833.

HARRIS, RICHARD, aged 75, and a resident of Madison County; private Massachusetts Militia; enrolled on September 26, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $80; sums received to date of publication of list, $200.-Revolitionary Pension. Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. He resided in Madison County, June 1, 1840.-Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148.

“ANOTHER REVOLUTIONARY SOLDIER GONE.

“Died, in Madison County, Ala., January 23d, 1853, Capt. RICHARD HARRIS. The deceased was born in Powhatan County, Va., on the 20th November 1758. When but a youth, at the age of 17, he entered the army, and with that veteran band of soldiers, fighting for liberty and truth, devoted himself to his country’s interests till the close of the war. He was an eyewitness of the surrender of Lord Cornwallis at Little York. After having shared with his countrymen the hardships of war, he returned to his home and friends to enjoy that glorious boon, liberty, for which he had so earnestly contended.

“Soon after the war, he devoted himself to the service of God and the good of his fellow men. He professed religion in Powhatan county, Va., and soon after united himself with the M. E. church, where he remained, for more than half a century, a consistent, useful, and much loved member.-Hospitable, kind, generous, you had only to look upon his noble face to behold all those commanding and ennobling virtues which adorn human nature. He removed from Virginia to Madison County, Ala., in 1809, and resided near Blue Spring till the day of his death. We do not say he was without fault, but we do say that few men have lived as long as he did with as few censurers and with as few enemies. He closed his earthly warfare as he closed the revolutionary war, in triumph and glory. He has left many friends to mourn his loss.”-The Southern Advocate, Huntsville, Feb. 9, 1853.

HART, HENRY, aged 71, and a resident of Greene County; private S. C. Militia; enrolled on September 26, 1833; under act of Congress of June 7, .1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $80; sums received to date of publication of list, $240.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. He resided in Greene County, June 1, 1840, aged 76.-Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 149.

HARVEY, JOHN, aged 75, and a resident of Lawrence County; private N. C. State Troops; enrolled on March 1, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $26.66.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd ,Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. He resided in Lawrence County, June 1, 1840, aged 82.-Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148.

“Died, in Lawrence County on the 23rd inst., Rev. JOHN HARVEY, an old Revolutionary veteran, in the 86th year of his age. These old soldiers are dropping into the grave rapidly, and there will soon be none of them left for Mr. Polk to vote against receiving pensions.”-Southern Advocate, Huntsville, Nov. 1, 1844.

Dr. Anson West in his History of Methodism in Alabama, p. 219, has the following brief tribute:

“John Harvey, who afterward attained to elder’s orders, and who continued a member of the Quarterly Conference of the Franklin Circuit until 1831, and who was a native of Virginian, and a Revolutionary soldier, and who was naturally endowed with the gifts of oratory, and was talented and pious, had his membership at Kitty Casky at the time of the Quarterly Conference above mentioned, and he died at that place afterward.”

HAUGHTON, ABRM., aged 81, resided in Lawrence County, June 1, 1840, with William Boyce.-Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148.

HEARNE, WILLIAM. In the Memorial Record of Alabama, vol. ii, p. 426, mention is made of William Hearne from North Carolina, a Revolutionary soldier, and it states that he died in Lowndes County, Ala. The grave is in a private burying ground which is now on the plantation belonging to I. D. Hauser of Opelika. It is on that part of the plantation that he bought of the Mickle estate, and very near Manack station. It is surrounded by a brick wall and apparently contains three or four graves.

William Hearne was a great-grandson of William Hearne of Maryland (1630), a wealthy merchant and planter. Thomas Hearne. a son of this colonists married Sally Wingate; he had twelve children, one of them, Nehemiah, married Betty and lived in Somerset county, Md. A son of Nehemiah, William Hearne, was born in Somerset County, Md., in 1746; he married his cousin, Tabitha Hearne, and moved to North Carolina, when it was a new country. At the commencement of the Revolutionary war he enlisted and served during the seven years and only missed being at General Gates’ defeat at Camden by being left behind with smallpox. He came to Alabama in 1819; he died September 21, 1832, in Lowndes County, Ala. These facts are obtained from the Hearne History, p. 383.

He left many descendants, among them may be mentioned the late Dr. Joseph T. Hearne, physician and planter of St. Clair, Lowndes County.-Mrs. P. H. Mell in Transactions of the Alabama Historical Society, vol. iv, p. 543.

HENDRICKS, HILLARY, aged 80, and a resident of Lawrence County; private N. C. Militia; enrolled on October 29, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $62.50; sums received to date of publication of list, $125.–Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

HENRY, JAMES, aged 74, and a resident of Tuscaloosa County; private Virginia Militia; enrolled on April 23, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $36.44; sums received to date of publication of list, $109.32.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

HERVEY, JOHN, aged 74, and a resident of Clarke County; private N. C. Militia; enrolled on October 7, 1833, tinder act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $35; sums received to date of publication of list, $105.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

HICKS, JOHN, a resident of St. Clair County; private, particular service not shown; enrolled on April 15, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832; annual allowance, $26.66; transferred from Georgia. Pension Book, State Branch Bank, Mobile.

HICKS, WILLIAM, aged 77, and a resident of Greene County; private Virginia Continental Line; enrolled on January 15, 1830, under act of Congress of March 18 ,1818, payment to date from January 4, 1830; annual allowance, $96; sums received to date of publication of list, $16; dropped under act May 1, 1820.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

HIDECKER, JOHN A., aged 86, and a resident of Autauga County; private S. C. Militia; enrolled on January 17, 1834, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $40.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Part 3, Vol. xiii, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. He resided in Pike County, June 1, 1840, with Sarah Reeks, aged 93.-Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 49.

HIGHTOWER, JOHN. “Mr. John Hightower recently died in Marengo County, Alabama, at the age of 126 years. He received a wound in the battle of Braddock’s defeat 99 years ago, and was a soldier in the Revolution. His age can be established by an authentic family record.”-Southern Advocate, Huntsville, Ala., Nov. 29, 1844.

HILDRETH, REUBEN.-”DIED-At his residence in this county, on Saturday 11th inst., Mr. Reuben Hildreth, in the 96th year of his age.

“Mr. Hildreth was a Revolutionary veteran and served his country well in war and peace. He reared a large family, and lived to see his children all happily settled in life.”-Marengo Ledger, reprinted in Alabama Beacon, Greensboro, Ala., Oct. 25, 1845.

HILL, JOEL, aged 72, and a resident of Limestone County; private N. C. Militia; enrolled on February 21, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $26.66; sums received to date of publication of list, $79.98.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv., Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

HILLHOUSE, WILLIAM, aged 75, and a resident of Marengo County; private, sergeant and lieutenant S. C. Militia; enrolled on March 3, 1834, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $200; sums received to date of publication of list, $600.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. He resided in Greene County, June 1, 1840, aged 81.-Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 149.

HILLSMAN, JOSE. At her residence in this county, on the 4th inst., MRS. ELIZABETH HILLSMAN, widow of the late Jose Hillsman, formerly of Amelia county, Va., in her 84th year. Her husband was a soldier of the Revolution, ‘and she was the last revolutionary pensioner of the General Government in this county. She was baptized in the Episcopal Church in Virginia, about the year 1800, and died professing repentance towards God and faith in the Lord Jesus Christ.-The Southern Advocate, Huntsville, Ala., Sept. 24, 1857.

HOFSTALAR, GEORGE, aged 71, and a resident of Blount County; private N. C. Continental Line; enrolled on November 22, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $77.50; sums received to date of publication of list, $232.50.-Revolutionary Pensoin Roll, in Part 3, Vol. xiii, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. Spelled also Huffstullar, and was a resident of Blount County, June 1, 1840, aged 76.-Census of Pensioners, 1840, p. 148.

HOGAN, CORDELL, a resident of Mobile County; private, particular service not shown; enrolled on March 4, 1831, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $30.-Pension Book, State Branch Bank, Mobile.

HOLLADAY, DANIEL, a resident of Marion County; sergeant, particular service not shown; enrolled on December 28, 1835, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $120. Pension Book, State Branch Bank, Mobile.

HOLLAND, CHARLES, aged 76, and a resident of Tuscaloosa County; private S. C. Militia; enrolled on July 2, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $80; sums received to date of publication of list, $240.-Revolutionary Pension. Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

HOLLAND, JACOB, came from South Carolina, and is buried at Hebron Churchyard, in Greene County. The following inscription is upon his tombstone :

Sacred to the
memory of
JACOB & SARAH HOLLAND
Jacob
departed this life
Oct. 1st, 1852,
Aged 91 years.
Sarah
May 13th, 1851,
Aged 87 years.

-Mrs. P. H. Mell in Transactions of the Alabama Historical Society, vol. iv, p. 544.

HOLLAND, JOHN, aged 68, and a resident of Sumter County; private S. C .State Troops; enrolled on April 17, 1834, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $80.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

HOLLAND, THOMAS, aged 71, and a resident of Limestone County; private S. C. Militia; enrolled on June 13, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $76.66.; sums received to date of publication of list, $229.98.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. He resided in Limestone County, June 1, 1840, aged 78.-Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148.

HOLLINGSHEAD, BENJAMIN, aged 72, and a resident of Bibb County; private N. C. State Troops; enrolled on March 5, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $40; sums received to date of publication of list, $100.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, Part 3, Vol xiii, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

HOLT, CHARLES, aged 72, and a resident of Blount County; private S. C. Militia; enrolled on October 29, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $28.33; sums received to date of publication of list, $84.99.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Part 3, Vol. xiii, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. He resided in Blount County, June 1, 1840, aged 78. -Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148.

HONEY, TOBIAS, aged 78, resided in Calhoun (then Benton) County, June 1, 1840, with Abel Brooks.-Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148.

HOOKS, CHARLES. “Charles Hooks is buried in Montgomery County, about twenty miles from the city of Montgomery, in a family burial ground on his plantation. It is now known as the ‘Old Moulton Place.’ His services in the Revolution in North Carolina are mentioned in Wheeler’s History of North Carolina, and Mrs. Ellet’s Women of the Revolution. There is an interesting chapter in the latter book, called ‘Mary Slocumb,’ which gives a delightful account of the beautiful home and patriotic deeds of Mary Hooks Slocumb, elder sister of Charles Hooks. Her husband was Lieu-tenant Ezekiel Slocumb, who raised a troop of light horse to watch the enemy and punish the Tories. In April 1781, just after the battle of Guilford Court House, the British colonel, Tarleton, made his headquarters at the Slocumb home in Wayne county. Charles Hooks, a lad of thirteen at the time, was away with his brother-in-law, Lieut. Slocumb, in hot pursuit of some Tory marauders. They narrowly escaped being captured upon their return, as they were ignorant of the fact that a thousand men were in possession of their home, but the warning of a faithful slave enabled them to retreat with safety.

“Charles Hooks was born in Bertie County, North Carolina, February 20th, 1768. and died in Montgomery county, Alabama, on the 18th of October, 1843. After the Revolution he married Mary Ann Hunter; she was the daughter of Isaac Hunter and Priscilla and granddaughter of Isaac Hunter of Chowan, N. C., who died in 1752, and whose will is on file among the records at Edenton, N. C.

Charles Hooks became a man of distinction. He went to the legislature from Duplin County in 1802-03-04 and again in 1810-11. He served seven years as a member of Congress in 1816-17 and again from 1819 to 1825. He moved to Alabama in 1826.

The descent of Charles Hooks is as follows :

(1) William Hooks, of Chowan County, North Carolina, who died in 1751 at an advanced age. Issue: William and John.

(2) John Hooks died in 1732; his wife was Ruth several children, among others,

(3) Thomas Hooks, who married (1) Anna , and had children, Mary, Charles and one other; married (2) Mrs. John Charles Slocumb.

Many descendants of Charles Hooks are living in Alabama.” -Mrs. P. H. Mell in the Transactions of the Alabama Historical Society, Vol. iv, pp. 545-6.

HOOFER, OBADIAH, a resident of Pickens County; private, particular service not shown; enrolled on April 14, 1836, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $42. Pension Book, State Branch Bank, Mobile.

HUBBARD, THOMAS, aged 79, and a resident of Morgan County; lieutenant, quartermaster and sergeant Virginia State Troops; enrolled on March 23, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $296.66; sums received to date of publication of list, $889.98.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. He resided in Morgan County, June 1, 1840, aged 87.-Census, of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148.

HUFF, JAMES, aged 74,. and a resident of Perry County; private Virginia Continental Line and Militia; enrolled on October 29, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $20.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

HUGHES, JOSEPH, aged 73, and a resident of Greene County; captain S. C. Militia; enrolled on July 2, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832; payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $480; sums received to date of publication of list, $1,440.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

Mrs. P. H. Mell in the Transactions of the Alabama Historical Society, Vol. iv, pp. 546, 548, presents an interesting account of Captain Hughes :

“Col. Joseph Hughes came from Union district, South Carolina, to Greene County, Alabama, in 1825. He was buried at Hebron cemetery in that county. The inscription upon his tomb is as follows :

In memory of
COL. JOSEPH HUGHES,
who departed this life
September 4th; 1834.
Aged 85 years.

“He was twice married; the name of his first wife has not been ascertained. She left seven children; their names were William Wright, Joseph, Mary, Martha, Sarah and Jane. Col. Joseph Hughes married for a second wife, Annie Brown of South Carolina; they had three children, Stewart, James and Annie. She was an aunt of Governor Albert G. Brown, of Mississippi. Her brother, John Brown, was killed at the battle of Cowpens. All of the children of Col. Hughes came to Alabama except William, who married and settled in South Carolina, and Wright, who was captain of a steamboat on Broad river in South Carolina. Mary married Kennedy; Martha, Morris; Sarah, Maberry; Jane, Bruner; Annie, White.

“Col. Hughes was a consistent member of the Presbyterian church. He is well remembered by Mrs. Jay, of Benevola, Ala., who is now (1904) in her ninetieth year. She has often heard him speak of his experiences in the Revolutionary war and she has seen and handled his sword and pistol, which were sacredly preserved because of their Revolutionary associations.

“Some of the brave exploits of Lieut. Joseph Hughes are described in Saye’s Memoir of McJunkin; an interesting biographical sketch of him may be found in a pamphlet entitled The Life of Col. James D. Williams (1898), by Rev. J. D. Bailey; and several notices of Capt. Joseph Hughes occur in Draper’s King’s Mountain and its Heroes, from which the following brief account of his life is taken, pp. 122, 129, 131-33, 277.

” ‘He was born in what is now Chester county, South Carolina, in 1761, his parents having retired there temporarily from the present region of Union county, on account of Indian troubles. He served in 1776 on Williamson’s Cherokee expedition and subsequently in Georgia. Governor Rutledge, early in 1780, commissioned him as a lieutenant and he fought under Sumter at Rocky Mount and Hanging Rock; and then shared in the heroic action of Musgrove’s Mill. His daredevil character and adventurous services in the up-country region of South Carolina during the summer and autumn of 1780 have already been related.

” ‘Then we find him taking part in the memorable engagements at King’s Mountain, Hammond’s Store and Cowpens. Though yet a lieutenant, he commanded his company in this latter action. He was not only a man of great personal strength, but of remarkable fleetness on foot. As his men with others broke at
the Cowpens and fled before Tarleton’s cavalry; and though receiving a sabre cut across his right hand, yet with his drawn sword, he would out-run his men, and passing them, face about and command them to stand, striking right and left to enforce obedience to orders; often repeating with a loud voice: ‘You d-d cowards, halt and fight,-there is more danger in running than in fighting, and if you don’t stop and fight you will all be killed.

” ‘But most of them were for a while too demoralized to realize the situation or to obey their officers. As they would scamper off, Hughes would renewably pursue and once more gaining their front would repeat his tactics to bring them to their duty. At length the company was induced to make a stand on the brow of a slope, some distance from the battle line behind a clump of young pines that partially concealed and protected them from Tarleton’s cavalry. Others now joined them for self-protection. Their guns were loaded quickly and they were themselves again. Morgan galloped up and spoke words of encouragement to them. The next moment the British cavalry were at them; but the Whigs re-served their fire till the enemy were so near that it was terribly effective, emptying many a British saddle, when the survivors recoiled. Now Colonel Washington gave them a charge -the battle was restored when Howard with his Marylanders with the bayonet, swept the field. Tarleton acknowledges that ‘an unexpected fire from the Americans, who came about as they were retreating, stopped the British and threw them into confusion’ when a panic ensued and then a general fight. It was a high and worthy compliment from his old commander, Colonel Brandon, who declared that at the Cowpens ‘Hughes saved the fate of the day.’

” ‘As a deserved recognition of these meritorious services he was promoted to a captaincy early in 1781, when he was scarcely twenty years of age and led his company with characteristic valor at the battle of Eutaw Springs. The Tories had killed his father during the war and many a dear friend, and his animosity against the whole race was alike bitter and unrelenting. In 1825 he removed to Alabama, first to Greene County and then to Pickens, where he died in September, 1834, in his seventy-fourth year. For more than twenty of the closing years of his life he was an elder in the Presbyterian Church and the rough and almost tigerlike partisan became as humble and submissive as a lamb. He rose to the rank of colonel in the militia. He was tall and commanding in his appearance, jovial and affable in conversation; yet his early military training rendered him to the last stern and rigid in discipline. In all that makes up the man he was a noble specimen of the Revolutionary hero.’ ”

HUGHES, WILLIAM, aged 82, and a resident of Shelby County; private N. C. Militia; enrolled on May 24, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $80.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

HUSBANDS, WILLIAM, aged 75, and a resident of Greene County; private N. C. Militia; enrolled July 2, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $80, sums received to date of publication of list, $240.-Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.



MLA Source Citation:

AccessGenealogy.com. Revolutionary Soldiers in Alabama. AccessGenealogy.com. Web. 29 July 2014. http://www.accessgenealogy.com/alabama/alabama-revolutionary-war-soldiers-h-surnames.htm - Last updated on Apr 21st, 2013


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