Alabama Land Cessions Map

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Alabama Land Cessions
Alabama Land Cessions

The Alabama Land Cessions map was initially drawn up for a series found in the 18th Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology. Specifically, it was created to reference the compilation by Charles C. Royce for the Indian Land Cessions in the United States. Since the map was drawn up in 1896 it only references those land cessions occurring before that year.

The Alabama Land Cessions map was drawn by A. Hoen & Company, Lithographers from Baltimore.

 

 

Map by Cession #

The map references 16 specific cessions as defined by Treaties, Acts and Agreements with Indian Tribes across Alabama. The treaties referenced by those areas can be found below:

  • Cession 46
    • Treaty of October 17, 1802
      Article 1 provides for retracing, connecting, and plainly re-marking the old line of limits established between His Britannic Majesty and the Choctaws, beginning on the left bank of the Chickasawhay river and running thence in an easterly direction to the right bank of the Tombigby river, terminating on the same at a bluff well known by the name of Hacha Tiggeby. Article 2 provides that the said line when thus re-marked shall form the boundary between the United States and the Choctaw Nation in that quarter, and the Choctaws relinquish to the United States all claim to the land included by the above-mentioned line on the North, by the Chickasawhay river on the West, by the Tombigby and the Mobile rivers on the East, and by the boundary of the United States on the South. This was simply a confirmation of a cession made to Great Britain by the Choctaw before the independence of the United States. The boundary lines of the old treaty of March 28, 1765, are but partially given.
  • Cession 61
    • Treaty of November 16, 1805
      The Choctaw nation cede to the United States all lands claimed by them lying to the right of the following lines, viz: Beginning at a branch of the Humacheeto, where the same is intersected by the present Choctaw boundary and also by the path leading from Natchez to the county of Washington, usually called McClarey’s Path; thence eastwardly along McClarey’s Path to the East or left bank of Pearl River; thence on such a direct line as would touch the lower end of a bluff on the left bank of Chickasawhay River, the first above the Hiyoowannee Towns, called Broken Bluff, to a point within 4 miles of the Broken Bluff; thence in a direct line, nearly parallel with the river, to a point whence an East line of 4 miles in length will intersect the river below the lowest settlement occupied and improved in the Hiyoowaunee town; thence still East 4 miles; thence in a direct line, nearly parallel with the river, to a point on a line to be run from the lower end of the Broken Bluff to Faluktabunnee, on the Tombigbee river, 4 miles from the Broken Bluff; thence along the said line to Faluktabunnee; thence East to the boundary between the Creek and Choctaws, on the ridge dividing the waters running into the Alabama from those running into Tombigbee; thence southwardly along the said ridge and boundary to the southern point of the Choctaw claim.
  • Cession 62
    • Treaty of November 16, 1805
      The Choctaws also reserve a tract of 5,120 acres, beginning at a post on the left bank of Tombigbee river, opposite the lower end of Hatchatigbee Bluff; thence ascending the river 4 miles front and 2 back; one-half for the use of Alzira and the other half for the use of Sophia, daughters of Samuel Mitchell, by Molly, a Choctaw woman. This reserve was partitioned and sold by the Mitchell family.
  • Cession 64
    • Treaty of January 7, 1806
      The Cherokees cede to the United States all claim to all that tract of country lying to the northward of the river Tennessee and westward of a line to be run from the upper part of the Chickasaw Old Fields, at the upper point of an island called Chickasaw Island, on said river, to the most easterly head waters of that branch of Tennessee River called Duck River. The boundaries of this cession overlap the Chickasaw cession of November 14, 1805, and in turn are overlapped by the boundaries of the Chickasaw cession of September 20, 1816. For explanation and elucidation of this cession, see Cherokee treaty of September 11, 1807.
  • Cession 75
    • Treaty of August 9, 1814
      The United States demand an equivalent for all expenses incurred in prosecuting the war to its termination by a cession of all the territory belonging to the Creek Nation, within the limits of the United States, lying West, South, and southeastwardly of a line to be run as follows: Beginning at a point on the eastern bank of Coosa River, where the South boundary line of the Cherokee Nation crosses the same; thence down the Coosa River, with its eastern bank, to a point 1 mile above the mouth of Cedar Creek at Fort Williams; thence East 2 miles; thence South 2 miles; thence West to the eastern bank of Coosa River; thence down the eastern bank thereof to a point opposite the upper end of the great falls (called by the natives Woetumka); thence East from a true meridian line to a point due North of the mouth of Ofucshee; thence South, by a like meridian line, to the mouth of Ofucshee, on the South side of Tallapoosa river; thence up the same to a point where a direct course will cross the same at the distance; of 10 miles from the mouth thereof; thence a direct line to the mouth of Summochico Creek, which empties into the Chatahouchie River on the East side, below the Eufaulau town; thence East from a true meridian line to a point which shall intersect the line dividing the lands claimed by the Creek Nation from those claimed and owned by the state of Georgia. If in running East from the mouth of Summochico Creek it shall happen that the settlement of the Kennards fall within the limits of this cession, then the line shall be run East on a true meridian to Kitcholoonee Creek; thence down the middle of the creek to its junction with Flint River, immediately below the Oakmulgee town; thence up the middle of Flint River to a point due East of that at which the above line struck the Kitchofoonee Creek; thence East to the old line dividing the lands claimed by the Creeks from those claimed and owned by the state of Georgia.
  • Cession 79
    • Treaty of September 14, 1816
      The Cherokee nation acknowledge the following as their western boundary: South of the Tennessee River, commencing at Camp Coffee, which is opposite the Chickasaw Island; running from thence a due South course to the top of the dividing ridge between the waters of the Tennessee and Tombigbee rivers; thence eastwardly along said ridge, leaving the headwaters of the Black Warrior to the right hand until opposed by the West branch of Will’s Creek; thence down the East bank of said creek to the Coosa River and down said river. The Cherokee nation relinquish to the United States all claim to lands lying South and West of the line above described.
  • Cession 80
    • Treaty of September 20, 1816
      The Chickasaw nation cede to the United States (with the exception of such reservations as shall hereafter be specified) all right or title to lands on the North side of Tennessee river. The Chickasaws also relinquish all claim to territory on the South side of Tennessee river and East of a line commencing at the month of Caney Creek and running up the same to its source; thence a due South course to the Ridge Path, commonly called Gaines’ Road; along said road southwestwardly to a point on Tombigby River, called Cotton Gin Port, and down the West bank of the Tombigby to the Choctaw boundary. This cession overlaps the Cherokee cession of September 11, 1816.
  • Cession 82
    • Treaty of October 24, 1816
      The Choctaw Nation cede to the United States all their claim to lands lying East of the following boundary: Beginning at the mouth of Ooktibbuha, the Chickasaw boundary, and running from thence down the Tombigby River until it intersects the northern boundary of a cession made to the United States by the Choctaws at Mount Dexter, Nov. 16, 1805.
  • Cession 85
    • Treaty of July 8, 1817
      The Cherokee nation also cede to the United States all right to the reservations made to Doublehead and others by the treaty made at Washington City, January 7, 1806. This cession consisted of two tracts on the North side of Tennessee River, one of which overlapped Culbert’s Reservation under Chickasaw treaty of September 20, 1816.
  • Cession 86
    • Treaty of July 8, 1817
      The Cherokee nation also cede to the United States all right to the reservations made to Doublehead and others by the treaty made at Washington City, January 7, 1806. This cession consisted of two tracts on the North side of Tennessee River, one of which overlapped Culbert’s Reservation under Chickasaw treaty of September 20, 1816.
  • Cession 101
    • Treaty of February 27, 1819
      The Cherokee Nation cedes to the United States all of their lands lying North and East of the following line, viz: Beginning on the Tennessee liver at the point where the Cherokee boundary with Madison County, in the Alabama territory, joins the same; thence along the main channel of said river to the mouth of the Highwassee; thence along its main channel to the first hill which closes in on said river, about 2 miles above Highwassee Old Town; thence along the ridge which divides the waters of the Highwassee and Little Tellico to the Tennessee river at Tallasee; thence along the main channel to the junction of the Cowee and Nanteyalee; thence along the ridge in the fork of said river to the top of the Blue Ridge; thence along the Blue Ridge to the Unicoy Turnpike road; thence by a straight line to the nearest main source of the Chestatee; thence along its main channel to the Chatahouchee; and thence to the Creek boundary; it being understood that all the islands in the Chestatee and the parts of the Tennessee and Highwassee (with the exception of Jolly’s Island in the Tennessee), which constitute a portion of the present boundary, belong to the Cherokees.
      The lines of cession from Hiwassee Old Town to Tennessee river at Talassee and also from the forks of Cowee and Nanteyalee rivers to the Blue Ridge were surveyed in June, 1819, by Robert Houston and James McIntosh, commissioners on behalf of the United States and the Cherokee Nation, respectively, Hon. Wilson Lumpkin was designated to run the line from the Unicoy turnpike crossing of the Blue Ridge to the nearest main source of the Chestatee, which he did. Houston began his survey 2 1/2 miles above Hiwassee Old Town, but found no ridge dividing the waters of Hiwassee from those of Little Tellico.
  • Cession 106
    • Treaty of February 27, 1819
      Also in trust, to be sold for the benefit of the Cherokee national school fund, a tract equal to 12 miles square, to be located by commencing at the point formed by the intersection of the boundary line of Madison County and then bank of the Tennessee river; thence along the said line and up the said river 12 miles.
  • Cession 156
    • Treaty of September 27, 1830
      Otherwise known as Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek. The Choctaw nation cede to the United States the entire country they own and possess East of the Mississippi River, and they agree to remove beyond the Mississippi River as early as practicable.
  • Cession 157
  • Cession 172
    • Treaty of March 24, 1832
      The Creek tribe of Indians cede to the United States all their land East of the Mississippi River.
  • Cession 178
    • Treaty of October 20, 1832
      The Chickasaw nation, finding themselves oppressed in their present situation by being made subject to the laws of the States in which they reside, which laws they can not understand, rather than submit to this evil, prefer to seek a home in the West where they may live and be governed by their own laws. Believing they can procure for themselves a home in a country suited to their wants and condition, provided they had the means to pay for the same, they have determined to sell their country and hunt a new home. Therefore, for the consideration hereinafter expressed, the Chickasaw nation cede to the U. S. all the land which they own on the East side of the Mississippi River, including all the country where they at present live and occupy. It is agreed that the boundary line between the Choctaw and Chickasaw country, as formerly owned by them East of the Mississippi, shall be definitely ascertained and established. This cession overlaps the Cherokee cession of September 14, 1816.
  • Cession 203
    • Treaty of December 29, 1835
      The Cherokee Nation cede to the United States all the lands owned, claimed or possessed by them East of the Mississippi River, and agree to remove West of that river.

Land Cessions by Tribe

The following information references the current tribal names for each specific land cession. It currently does not include the Creek land cessions.

Cession #
County
Tribe
Present-Day Tribal Name
46WashingtonChoctawChoctaw Nation of Oklahoma
46MobileChoctawJena Band of Choctaw Indians, Louisiana
46MobileChoctawMississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Mississippi
46ClarkeChoctawChoctaw Nation of Oklahoma
46WashingtonChoctawJena Band of Choctaw Indians, Louisiana
46ClarkeChoctawMississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Mississippi
46ClarkeChoctawJena Band of Choctaw Indians, Louisiana
46WashingtonChoctawMississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Mississippi
46MobileChoctawChoctaw Nation of Oklahoma
61ClarkeChoctawJena Band of Choctaw Indians, Louisiana
61WashingtonChoctawJena Band of Choctaw Indians, Louisiana
61WashingtonChoctawMississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Mississippi
61ClarkeChoctawMississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Mississippi
61ChoctawChoctawJena Band of Choctaw Indians, Louisiana
61ChoctawChoctawChoctaw Nation of Oklahoma
61ClarkeChoctawChoctaw Nation of Oklahoma
61WashingtonChoctawChoctaw Nation of Oklahoma
61ChoctawChoctawMississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Mississippi
62ClarkeChoctawChoctaw Nation of Oklahoma
62ClarkeChoctawMississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Mississippi
62ClarkeChoctawJena Band of Choctaw Indians, Louisiana
64LauderdaleCherokeeEastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina
64LauderdaleCherokeeCherokee Nation, Oklahoma
64LauderdaleCherokeeUnited Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma
64LimestoneCherokeeCherokee Nation, Oklahoma
64MadisonCherokeeEastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina
64LimestoneCherokeeEastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina
64LimestoneCherokeeUnited Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma
64MadisonCherokeeCherokee Nation, Oklahoma
64MadisonCherokeeUnited Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma
79BlountCherokeeEastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina
79MorganCherokeeCherokee Nation, Oklahoma
79EtowahCherokeeUnited Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma
79MarshallCherokeeCherokee Nation, Oklahoma
79MarshallCherokeeEastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina
79MorganCherokeeUnited Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma
79MorganCherokeeEastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina
79CullmanCherokeeCherokee Nation, Oklahoma
79ColbertCherokeeEastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina
79ColbertCherokeeCherokee Nation, Oklahoma
79CullmanCherokeeEastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina
79BlountCherokeeCherokee Nation, Oklahoma
79ColbertCherokeeUnited Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma
79St. ClairCherokeeCherokee Nation, Oklahoma
79LawrenceCherokeeCherokee Nation, Oklahoma
79LawrenceCherokeeUnited Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma
79LawrenceCherokeeEastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina
79CullmanCherokeeUnited Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma
79FranklinCherokeeEastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina
79EtowahCherokeeEastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina
79WinstonCherokeeUnited Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma
79BlountCherokeeUnited Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma
79MarshallCherokeeUnited Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma
79EtowahCherokeeCherokee Nation, Oklahoma
79WinstonCherokeeEastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina
79FranklinCherokeeUnited Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma
79FranklinCherokeeCherokee Nation, Oklahoma
79St. ClairCherokeeUnited Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma
79St. ClairCherokeeEastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina
79WinstonCherokeeCherokee Nation, Oklahoma
80WalkerChickasawChickasaw Nation, Oklahoma
80CullmanChickasawChickasaw Nation, Oklahoma
80ColbertChickasawChickasaw Nation, Oklahoma
80MarionChickasawChickasaw Nation, Oklahoma
80LimestoneChickasawChickasaw Nation, Oklahoma
80MadisonChickasawChickasaw Nation, Oklahoma
80FayetteChickasawChickasaw Nation, Oklahoma
80FranklinChickasawChickasaw Nation, Oklahoma
80LauderdaleChickasawChickasaw Nation, Oklahoma
80LamarChickasawChickasaw Nation, Oklahoma
80LawrenceChickasawChickasaw Nation, Oklahoma
80MorganChickasawChickasaw Nation, Oklahoma
80WinstonChickasawChickasaw Nation, Oklahoma
82ClarkeChoctawJena Band of Choctaw Indians, Louisiana
82ClarkeChoctawMississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Mississippi
82TuscaloosaChoctawMississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Mississippi
82HaleChoctawMississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Mississippi
82PickensChoctawJena Band of Choctaw Indians, Louisiana
82HaleChoctawChoctaw Nation of Oklahoma
82ClarkeChoctawChoctaw Nation of Oklahoma
82HaleChoctawJena Band of Choctaw Indians, Louisiana
82GreeneChoctawJena Band of Choctaw Indians, Louisiana
82JeffersonChoctawJena Band of Choctaw Indians, Louisiana
82JeffersonChoctawMississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Mississippi
82GreeneChoctawChoctaw Nation of Oklahoma
82BibbChoctawChoctaw Nation of Oklahoma
82BibbChoctawJena Band of Choctaw Indians, Louisiana
82GreeneChoctawMississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Mississippi
82JeffersonChoctawChoctaw Nation of Oklahoma
82BibbChoctawMississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Mississippi
82PerryChoctawChoctaw Nation of Oklahoma
82PerryChoctawJena Band of Choctaw Indians, Louisiana
82MarengoChoctawJena Band of Choctaw Indians, Louisiana
82MarengoChoctawMississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Mississippi
82TuscaloosaChoctawJena Band of Choctaw Indians, Louisiana
82MarengoChoctawChoctaw Nation of Oklahoma
82TuscaloosaChoctawChoctaw Nation of Oklahoma
82PerryChoctawMississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Mississippi
82PickensChoctawChoctaw Nation of Oklahoma
82PickensChoctawMississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Mississippi
85LauderdaleCherokeeCherokee Nation, Oklahoma
85LimestoneCherokeeUnited Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma
85LauderdaleCherokeeUnited Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma
85LauderdaleCherokeeEastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina
85LimestoneCherokeeEastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina
85LimestoneCherokeeCherokee Nation, Oklahoma
86LauderdaleCherokeeCherokee Nation, Oklahoma
86LauderdaleCherokeeEastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina
86LauderdaleCherokeeUnited Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma
101MadisonCherokeeCherokee Nation, Oklahoma
101MadisonCherokeeUnited Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma
101MarshallCherokeeEastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina
101MarshallCherokeeCherokee Nation, Oklahoma
101MarshallCherokeeUnited Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma
101JacksonCherokeeCherokee Nation, Oklahoma
101JacksonCherokeeUnited Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma
101JacksonCherokeeEastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina
101MadisonCherokeeEastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina
106MadisonCherokeeUnited Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma
106MadisonCherokeeEastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina
106MadisonCherokeeCherokee Nation, Oklahoma
156PickensChoctawMississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Mississippi
156PickensChoctawChoctaw Nation of Oklahoma
156ChoctawChoctawJena Band of Choctaw Indians, Louisiana
156SumterChoctawChoctaw Nation of Oklahoma
156SumterChoctawJena Band of Choctaw Indians, Louisiana
156ChoctawChoctawMississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Mississippi
156SumterChoctawMississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Mississippi
156PickensChoctawJena Band of Choctaw Indians, Louisiana
156ChoctawChoctawChoctaw Nation of Oklahoma
157ClarkeChoctawJena Band of Choctaw Indians, Louisiana
157ClarkeChoctawMississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Mississippi
157ClarkeChoctawChoctaw Nation of Oklahoma
178FranklinChickasawChickasaw Nation, Oklahoma
178MarionChickasawChickasaw Nation, Oklahoma
203MorganCherokeeEastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina
203CleburneCherokeeCherokee Nation, Oklahoma
203CleburneCherokeeEastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina
203De KalbCherokeeEastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina
203De KalbCherokeeCherokee Nation, Oklahoma
203MorganCherokeeUnited Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma
203CherokeeCherokeeCherokee Nation, Oklahoma
203MarshallCherokeeCherokee Nation, Oklahoma
203CleburneCherokeeUnited Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma
203MarshallCherokeeEastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina
203EtowahCherokeeCherokee Nation, Oklahoma
203EtowahCherokeeUnited Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma
203MarshallCherokeeUnited Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma
203EtowahCherokeeEastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina
203CalhounCherokeeEastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina
203JacksonCherokeeCherokee Nation, Oklahoma
203CalhounCherokeeCherokee Nation, Oklahoma
203BlountCherokeeEastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina
203BlountCherokeeCherokee Nation, Oklahoma
203JacksonCherokeeEastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina
203JacksonCherokeeUnited Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma
203MorganCherokeeCherokee Nation, Oklahoma
203BlountCherokeeUnited Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma
203CherokeeCherokeeEastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina
203CalhounCherokeeUnited Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma
203CherokeeCherokeeUnited Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma
203De KalbCherokeeUnited Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma

Map References

The following pages on our site (and others) references the Alabama Land Cessions Map. We do not include the treaties already listed above.

  1. Alabama Land Cessions by Native American Tribes
    The Native American tribes of Alabama who ceded lands to the United States Government. Included in this list, were the tribes names at the time of the cession, and present day tribal name.


MLA Source Citation:

AccessGenealogy.com. Web. 28 September 2014. http://www.accessgenealogy.com/alabama/alabama-land-cessions-map.htm - Last updated on May 3rd, 2013


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