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Arkansas Genealogy at Ancestry

Ancestry is the largest provider of genealogy data online. The billions of records they provide have advanced genealogy online beyond imagination just a decade ago. The following is but a small sample of what they provide for Arkansas genealogy at Ancestry. While some of these databases are free, many require a subscription. You can try a 14 day free trial and see if you can find any of your Arkansas genealogy at Ancestry! Arkansas Genealogy Databases – Subscription May be Required Ancestry Free Trial Arkansas Statewide Genealogy at Ancestry Arkansas Biographical History Arkansas Census, 1819-70 Arkansas Census, 1840 Arkansas Death Index, 1914-1950 Arkansas Divorce Index, 1923-1939 Arkansas History and Pioneers Arkansas Marriage Index, 1933-1939 Arkansas Marriages to 1850 Arkansas Marriages, 1779-1992 Arkansas Marriages, 1851-1900 Arkansas, County Marriages Index, 1837-1957 Arkansas, Homestead and Cash Entry Patents, Pre-1908 Arkansas, Naturalization Records, 1907-1968 Biographical and pictorial history of Arkansas Early days in Arkansas : being for the most part the personal recollections of an old settler Eastern Arkansas Biographies and Historical Memoirs Northeast Arkansas Biographies and Historical Memoirs Northwestern Arkansas History Pictorial History of Arkansas Up to 1890 Pioneers and Makers of Arkansas Pioneers and makers of Arkansas Web: Arkansas, Find A Grave Index, 1819-2012 Western Arkansas Biographies and Historical Memoirs Arkansas Military Data at Ancestry Arkansas, Confederate Pension Records, 1891-1935 Miscellaneous Arkansas data at Ancestry Behind these Ozark hills : history, reminiscences, traditions featuring the author’s family Building a state capitol Conversations on the mission to the Arkansas Cherokees Fresh from the hills Pine Mountain Americans Report of the Adjutant General of Arkansas, for the period of the late rebellion, and to November 1,...

Treaty of June 2, 1825

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at St. Louis, in the State of Missouri, between William Clark, Superintendent of Indian Affairs, Commissioner on the part of the United States, and the undersigned, Chiefs, Head-Men, and Warriors, of the Great and Little Osage Tribes of Indians, duly authorized and empowered by their respective Tribes or Nations. In order more effectually to extend to said Tribes that protection of the Government so much desired by them, it is agreed as follows: Article I. The Great and Little Osage Tribes or Nations do, hereby, cede and relinquish to the United States, all their right, title, interest, and claim, to lands lying within the State of Missouri and Territory of Arkansas, and to all lands lying West of the said State of Missouri and Territory of Arkansas, North and West of the Red River, South of the Kansas River, and East of a line to be drawn from the head sources of the Kansas, Southwardly through the Rock Saline, with such reservations, for such considerations, and upon such terms as are hereinafter specified, expressed, and provided for. Article II. Within the limits of the country, above ceded and relinquished, there shall be reserved, to, and for, the Great and Little Osage Tribes or Nations, aforesaid, so long as they may choose to occupy the same, the following described tract of land: beginning at a point due East of White Hair’s Village, and twenty-five miles West of the Western boundary line of the State of Missouri, fronting on a North and South line, so as to leave ten miles North, and forty miles...

Treaty of November 15, 1824

Articles of a treaty between the United States of America and the Quapaw Nation of Indians. Article I. The Quapaw Nation of Indians cede to the United States of America, in consideration of the promises and stipulations hereinafter made, all claim or title which they may have to lands in the Territory of Arkansas, comprised in the following boundaries, to wit: Beginning at a point on the Arkansas river, opposite to the Post of Arkansas, and running thence a due south-west course to the Ouachita river; and thence, up the same, to the Saline Fork; and up the Saline Fork, to a point from whence a due north-east course will strike the Arkansas river at Little Rock: and thence down the right (or south bank) of the Arkansas river to the place of beginning. Article II. In consideration of the cession made in the first article of this Treaty, by the aforesaid Chiefs and Warriors, the United States engage to pay to the four head Chiefs of the Quapaw Nation, the sum of five hundred dollars each, in consideration of the losses they will sustain by removing from their farms and improvements. The payment to be made at the time they receive their annuity for the year 1825. And, also, to the said nation, the sum of four thousand dollars, to be paid in goods, at the signing of this Treaty. And the United States also engage to pay to the Quapaw Nation, one thousand dollars in specie, annually, for the term of eleven years, in addition to their present annuity. Article III. The United States hereby guaranty to...

Treaty of August 24, 1818

A treaty of friendship, cession, and limits, made and entered into, this twenty-fourth day of August, eighteen hundred and eighteen, by, and between, William Clark and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners on the part and behalf of the United States, of the one part, and the undersigned, chiefs and warriors of the Quapaw tribe or nation, on the part and behalf of their said tribe or nation, of the other part. Article I. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and their said tribe or nation, do hereby acknowledge themselves to be under the protection of the United States, and of no other state, power, or sovereignty, whatsoever. Article II. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and their said tribe or nation, do hereby, for, and in consideration of, the promises and stipulations hereinafter named, cede and relinquish to the United States, forever, all the lands within the following boundaries, viz: Beginning at the mouth of the Arkansaw river; thence extending up the Arkansaw, to the Canadian fork, and up the Canadian fork to its source; thence south, to Big Red river, and down the middle of that river, to the Big Raft; thence, a direct line, so as to strike the Mississippi river, thirty leagues in a straight line, below the mouth of Arkansaw; together with all their claims to land east of the Mississippi, and north of the Arkansaw river, included within the coloured lines 1, 2, and 3, on the above map, (*A map accompanies the original treaty.) with the exception and reservation following, that is to say: the tract of country bounded as follows: Beginning at...

Biographical Sketch of Dr. John N. Raley

John N. Raley is a native of Belmont county, Ohio, and was born April 11, 1829; his parents were natives of Virginia. He was educated at the Mount Pleasant Seminary, of Mount Pleasant, Ohio, and lived upon a farm until he was twenty-two years old, then began clerking on a steamboat on the Illinois River, where he was engaged for two years. He was next employed in keeping books for grain merchants on the Chicago & Alton Railroad, in Illinois, and after a few years there moved to the State of Iowa and engaged in farming for two years. In 1857 he began the study of medicine under the direction of Dr. Schatz, of Elsah, Jersey county, Illinois, and graduated in 1861, at the Eclectic Schools of Cincinnati, Ohio. During 1860 and a part of 1861 he was associated with Dr. H. R. Emmons, late of this county, at Maysville, Arkansas, and was there when the war broke out. After he finished his education he resumed practice in Bond county, Illinois, and in 1863 came to this county and settled at Salem, where he had an extensive practice. Early in 1864 he was commissioned assistant surgeon of the Tenth Regiment Missouri Volunteer Cavalry and served. in that capacity until the regiment was mustered out, June 30, 1865. He then resumed practice in this county, and settled in Jameson soon after it was started and has been favored with a large practice, not only in the town, but in that whole vicinity. Dr. Raley was united in marriage, November 2, 1862, in Bond county, Illinois, to Miss M. E. Rex....

Biographical Sketch of John B. Dinsmore

Is a native of Daviess county and was born in Jackson township on the 10th of April, 1850. He was reared and received his education wholly in this county. In August, 1870, he went to Kansas and there engaged in railroading. Part of his time in that State was spent in Emporia, where he remained till September, 1872. He then came to Daviess county, and locating in Jackson township, was soon called on to serve his fellow-citizens in a public office. He was elected township constable and collector, and served two years, refusing reelection. From that time he turned his attention to farming and stock-raising, till his health failed him. He made a trip to Eureka Springs, Arkansas, and after his return came to Jamesport, where he went into his present business of butchering and stock-trading. Mr. Dinsmore was married on the 9th of March, 1876, in Harrison county, Missouri, to Miss M. M. Travis, daughter of Mr. David Travis. Mr. Dinsmore is a thorough business man, and his worth, in this particular, is duly appreciated by his many...

Bowman, Wallace R., Sr. – Obituary

Wallace R. Bowman, Sr., 73 years old, 27198 Oak Drive, died Aug. 20, 1988, at the Veterans Administration Hospital, Fort Wayne, Ind. He was born July 19, 1915, in Elkhart County, Ind., a son of Frank A. and Carrie (Lampe) Bowman. On Feb. 4, 1943, he married Marion Schrader in Hot Springs, Ark. She died March 12, 1978. On April 6, 1983, he married Nancy Hunt in Sturgis. He was a Sturgis resident most of his life and was employed at the Kirsch Company. For 42 years, he had operated the B & W Tavern, retiring in 1983. He was a member of the Jack Johnston Chapter 88 disabled American Veterans, American Legion Post 303, Bonita Springs, Fla., Loyal Order of the Moose 574, American Association of Retired Persons and the Michigan United Conservation Clubs. He was a life member of the Fraternal Order of the Eagles Aerie 1314 and the Sturgis Elks Lodge 1381. Surviving are his wife; one son, Wallace R. Bowman Jr., Sturgis; five grandchildren; nine great grandchildren; and one sister, Geraldine Wolfe, Bronson. He was preceded in death by his parents. Relative and friends may call after 2 p.m. today at the Rosenberg-Schipper Funeral Home, Sturgis, where the family will receive friends from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. today. Services are at 1 p.m. Tuesday at the funeral home with the Rev. Ray Burgess, First United Methodist Church, officiating. Burial will be in Oak Lawn Cemetery with military honors conferred by the Captain John J. Kelley, Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 1355, Sturgis. Memorials may be directed to the American Cancer Society. Envelopes are available...

Arkansas World War 2 NMCG Casualty List

Inclusion of names in this Arkansas World War II Casualty List has been determined solely by the residence of next of kin at the time of notification of the last wartime casualty status. This listing does not necessarily represent the State of birth, legal residence, or official State credit according to service enlistment. Casualties listed represent only those on active duty in the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard, resulting directly from enemy action or from operational activities against the enemy in war zones from December 7, 1941, to the end of the war. Casualties in the United States area or as a result of disease, homicide or suicide in any location is not included. This is a state summary taken from casualty lists released by the Navy Department, corrected as to the most recent casualty status and recorded residence of next of kin. Personnel listed as MISSING are under continuous investigation by the Navy Department, and therefore will be officially presumed or determined dead. Some will be found alive. The last official notice to next of kin will take precedence over this list. Compiled, February 1946 State Summary of War Casualties Dead:          Combat 788          Prison Camp 12 Missing 36 Wounded 891 Released Prisoners 74 Total 1804 Arkansas World War 2 NMCG Casualty List Arkansas WW2 NMCG Casualty List – A Surnames Arkansas WW2 NMCG Casualty List – B Surnames Arkansas WW2 NMCG Casualty List – C Surnames Arkansas WW2 NMCG Casualty List – D-E Surnames Arkansas WW2 NMCG Casualty List – F-G Surnames Arkansas WW2 NMCG Casualty List – H Surnames Arkansas WW2 NMCG Casualty...

Arkansas WW2 NMCG Prisoners of War

CHASTAIN, Eldon Toblas, Pvt, USMC. Father, Mr. Thomas J. Chastain, Route 1, Sherrill. HAMMOCK, William Lester, Jr., Sgt, USMC. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. William L. Hammock, Sr., R. F. D. 1, Dermott. HOWARD, William Archie, Cpl, USMC. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. William G. Howard, 208 W. 7th St., North Little Rock. HUTCHISON, Leonard Wallace, Chief Electrician’s Mate, USNR. Sister, Mrs. Ellen H. Hunt, Clarksville. (Wife liberated from prison camp, 709 Genessee St., Rochester, New York.) LEVY, Benjamin Henry, Jr., Ensign, USNR. Father, Mr. Benjamin Henry Levy, Sr., Blytheville. MANN, Ralph C., Jr., 1st Lt, USMC. Father, Mr. Ralph C. Mann, Sr., Judsonia. MUSICK, Arthur Benton, Fireman 1c, USN. Father, Mr. Clarence Fletcher Musick, Box 303, North Little Rock. NANCE, Zelmer B., Cpl, USMCR. Mother, Mrs. Ellen Nance, Route 1, Scranton. NASH, Edward C., Pfc, USMC. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ellis C. Nash, Box 2, Lawson. NATIONS, Morris E., Cpl, USMC. Father, Mr. J. C. Nations, Prairie Grove. NELON, George Kirkwood, Electrician’s Mate 3c, USN. Father, Mr. Scott Nelon, England. SELBY, Harold Vernon, Cpl, USMC. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Oscar D. Selby, Route 3, Springdale. WELLS, Arthur Jr., Pharmacist’s Mate 1c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Wells, Route 1, Vilonia. YEARGIN, Marion Richard, Torpedoman 2c, USN. Sister, Mrs. Gladys Brogdon, Springdale. ZIMMERMAN, Paul, Gunner’s Mate 2c, USN. Mother, Mrs. Willie Wallin,...
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