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Biography of Alice C. Fletcher

Fletcher credited Frederic Ward Putnam for stimulating her interest in American Indian culture. She studied the remains of the Indian civilization in the Ohio and Mississippi valleys, became a member of the Archaeological Institute of America in 1879, and worked and lived with the Omahas as a representative of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University. These times marked the beginning of her 40-year association with an Omaha named Francis La Flesche. They collaborated professionally and also had an informal mother-son relationship. They lived together in Washington, D.C., beginning in 1890. In 1883 she was appointed special agent to allot lands to the Miwok tribes, in 1884 prepared and sent to the World Cotton Centennial an exhibit showing the progress of civilization among the Indians of North America in the quarter-century previous, in 1886 visited the natives of Alaska and the Aleutian Islands on a mission from the commissioner of education, and in 1887 was United States special agent in the distribution of lands among the Winnebagoes and Nez Perces. She was made assistant in ethnology at the Peabody Museum in 1882, and received the Thaw fellowship in 1891 which was created for her. She was president of the Anthropological Society of Washington and of the American Folklore Society, and vice-president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Working through the Womans National Indian Association, she introduced a system of making small loans to Indians, wherewith they might buy land and houses. Later she helped write, lobbied for and helped administer the Dawes Act of 1887 which broke up reservations and substituted individual ownership of...

Omaha Tribe History in Nebraska

The Omaha, so far as known, formerly dwelt in villages composed of dwellings made of sod and timber. The illustration gives the outward appearance of these dwellings, which are built by setting carefully selected and prepared posts closely together in a circle and binding them firmly with willows, then backing them with dried grass and covering the entire structure with closely packed sods. The roof is made in the same manner, having an additional support of an inner circle of posts, with crotches to hold the cross logs which act as beams to the dome-shaped roof. A circular opening in the centre serves as a chimney and also to give light to the interior of the dwelling; as seen in the picture, a sort of sail, is rigged and fastened outside of this opening to guide the smoke and prevent it from annoying the inmates of the lodge. The entrance passage way usually faces the east, is from 6 to 10 feet long, and is built in the same manner as the lodge. A skin or blanket is hung at the outer opening, and another at the inner entrance, thus affording a double protection against wind and cold. The fire is kindled in a hollowed place in the centre of the floor, and around the wall are arranged platforms made of reeds, on which robes are spread for use as seats by day and as beds by night. These couches are often fitted with an upright framework, on which skins or blankets are hung to be dropped as curtains, thus giving privacy to the occupants. Two, three, or four...

The Supernatural Among the Omaha Tribe of Indians

To comprehend the ideas of a people concerning the preternatural and the manifestations of the supernatural among them, it is needful to know something of their beliefs relating to the origin and the future of mankind; their notions pertaining to the natural world and their religious ceremonies. A clearly defined cosmogony does not exist among the Omaha tribe of Indians. Myths tell of water animals being engaged in forming the earth, but how water was created, or how life began, is left in definite. The general belief of the Omaha Indians is, that in some way man has been developed from animals. How this came about no myth and no man give any explanation. No story exists where a man is born of an animal; yet, as the life of man depends upon the animal as food, so in some mysterious manner the two are bound together in the general continuity that pervades the universe. In the myth telling of the birth of woman a younger brother is made the medium; a strange thorn pierces his foot, he extracts it, and wraps it in coverings of skin. When the older brothers return home they are startled by hearing a crying, and upon examination of the bundle from which the sound proceeds, they find to their astonishment a baby in the place of the thorn. The infant rapidly becomes a woman; all the animals obey her call, and she enriches her brothers by her skill and industry. The myths seem to indicate a linking together of all forms of life throughout nature. The various animals are endowed with speech, and...

Map of Omaha Indian Reservation, Nebraska

Showing portion thereof appraised for sale, and portion retained and allotted the Omaha Indians in severalty for the years 1905-1906. The map of the Omaha Indian Reservation in Thurston Nebraska was split into 9 pages in the original manuscript and is presented as they had it split. The numbers listed on the maps below are only a rough idea.  Find the name of the person you are searching for and then look on the map to find the location. All land is is Thurston County, Nebraska. Map 1 31 45 47 48 104 122 144-150  197 418 485 497 545 547 572-594  622 701 733 766 Map 2 1-143 and 163, 220, 221, 249, 306, 608, 681, 809, 815, 918 Map 3 139 618-808 and 1420-1536 Map 4 160-432 and 1639-1691 Map 5 433-616 and 1693-1785 Map 6 812-925 and 1537-1637 Map 7 927-977 and 1365-1418 Map 8 978-999 and 1009-1099 and 1200-1360 Map 9 1104-1195 Anderson, O. C. 1406 Ashley, J. R. 123, 130, 132, 133 Atkin, Louise Paul 1430 Ballou, Kate 1455 Barber, F. B. 674, 1451, 1454 Barber, J. L. 386, 1267 Barnaby, Josaphine 1618 Baxter, Amos 939, 1348 Baxter, Bertie 936, 987 Baxter, Chas. 1349 Baxter, Chris 1343 Baxter, David 937 Baxter Fannie P. 1273 Baxter, Harry 934, 1078 Baxter, Harry 934, 1078 Baxter, John 134, 944 Baxter, Lenora S. 1300 Baxter, Louisa White 563 Baxter, Richard 3 Baxter, Samuel 1367 Baxter, Thomas 1375 Baxter, Ta-in-ne 1368 Baxter, Ash-na-me-ha 137 Baxter, Washington 1695 Baylis, Elizabeth Paul 1431 Baylis, Harrison D. 673 Baylor, Henry 1160 Beckenhauer, Chas. 120 Benedict, T. G. 636, 648 Big Elk, Ponca-we 1061...

Omaha Indians in Nebraska

The Omaha tribe of Indians live in the State of Nebraska about 80 miles north of the city of Omaha, on a reservation 12 miles in length north and south, and bounded on the east by the Missouri River and on the west by the Sioux City and Omaha Railroad. Of the various tribes living in Nebraska when the white settlers first entered the Territory the Omaha are the only Indians remaining upon their ancient home lands.

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