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Biography of Danford Rice

Danford Rice, late a well-known farmer of Claremont, who died August 4, 1877, was born in this town, December 2, 1805. His grandfather, Ebenezer Rice, who was one of the earliest settlers of Claremont, coming with a little colony of pioneers from Tolland, Conn., bought considerable land in the village, but afterward removed to West Claremont. He was a carpenter by trade, and framed the old Union church at West Claremont. He was a Deacon of the church, and in the absence of a minister he used to read the services. A stanch patriot, he fought for American independence in the Revolution. His death occurred April 24, 1829. His children were: Joseph; Stephen; Ebenezer; and Phebe, who became Mrs. Timothy Grannis. His son Joseph was a prosperous farmer, a man of influence in the town, and one of the leading members of the Union Church. He married Lucy Barron, who was born June 14, 1772. He died April 24, 1829, his wife surviving him until August 28, 1847. They had a large family of children. Minerva, the eldest, born November 30, 1795, married Daniel Bond. Horace was born July 2, 1801. He died in Cambridge, Mass., in 1872. Franklin was born May 2, 1803; and Sanford and Danford, twins, were born December 2, 1805. Sanford was lost in the Mexican War. Phebe Pamelia was born January 18, 1809, and married Harvey Tolles. George Gilbert, born September 19, 1811, lived in Cambridge, Mass., and died there in 1863. Hiram Augustus, born September 27, 1814, died in Missouri. The children of Horace Rice by his wife, formerly Maria Hall, were: Joseph...

Biography of Abiathar Richards

Abiathar Richards, a retired merchant of Newport, was born here, October 8, 1825, son of Seth and Fanny Richards, of Dedham, Mass. He is descended from Edward Richards, one of the twelve immigrants bearing that surname, who, England to this country at different times in the period between 1630 and 1728, and whose descendants are to-day represented in the learned professions, the arts, commerce, and the general business of the country. Edward Richards, who arrived in 1632, was the sixth of the twelve referred to. With him, a fellow-passenger on the ship “Lion,” was his brother Nathaniel, who afterward joined the party led by the Rev. Mr. Hooker through the wilderness to the valley of the Connecticut, and was among the founders of Hartford. While a resident of Cambridge, Mass., on September 10, 1638, Edward married Susan Hunting. He was afterward one of the sixty-two original proprietors of the town of Dedham, near Boston, where many of his descendants are to be found to-day. He spent the rest of his life in Dedham, and died there in 1684. From Edward the line of descent comes through John (first), John (second), John (third), and Abiathar to the sixth generation, represented by Sylvanus, who in the beginning of this century moved with his family to Newport, N.H., and settled on a large tract of land in the western part of the township, on what is known as the “old road” to Claremont. Sylvanus Richards was for some years one of the largest land-owners and tax-payers in the town. In addition to conducting his farm he kept a wayside inn. About the...

Biography of Amos Richardson

Amos Richardson, an influential resident of Cornish, was born here, November 27, 1817, son of Amos and Sophia (Cummings) Richardson. He is a descendant of Dr. Amos Richardson, who was a physician of note in Pelham, N.H. Dr. Amos’s son, Joseph, was grandfather of the subject of this sketch. Joseph’s children were: Miriam, Joseph, David, Josiah, Sarah, Mercy, Rebecca, and Amos. Miriam, now deceased, was the wife of Joshua Wyman, of Pelham, and the mother of seven children; Joseph married Polly Hilliard, of Cornish, and had a family of twelve children; David, now deceased, married Sarah Ford, and was the father of seven children; Josiah, who was unmarried, is deceased; Sarah married John Huggins, and is now deceased; Mercy, who married Aaron Hibbard, had no children, and is now deceased; Rebecca, who never married, lived to be eighty-two years of age. Amos Richardson, Sr., a native of Pelham, born in November, 1785, moved to Cornish with his parents when only four years of age. After finishing his education, which was obtained in the town schools, he went to Massachusetts; but after a while, at the urgent request of his parents, he came back to carry on the farm, the present homestead of his son. He was very prominent in the town, and was much interested in town affairs. He was Tax Collector for a number of years, also Selectman; and he was a candidate for the legislature. In politics he was a Federalist. Of a religious disposition, he was Deacon of the Baptist church for many years. He married Sophia Cummings, who bore him eight children-Sarah, Amos, Louisa, William,...

Biography of Oscar F. Richardson

Oscar F. Richardson, a wellknown citizen of Concord, was born at Southbridge, Vt., January 2, 1835, son of Hazen and Zilby (Whitcomb) Richardson. Hazen Richardson was a native of the State of New Hampshire, and was a carpenter by trade. He removed to Whitehall, N.Y., quite early in life, and passed most of his 1860, at the age of about seventy years. He and his wife, Zilby Whitcomb Richardson, had eight children; namely, Delilah, Dequesna, Lillian, Cornelia, Oscar F., Henrietta, Jeffers O., and Alice, of whom Delilah, Dequesna, Lillian, Jeffers O., and Alice are now deceased. Oscar F. Richardson, after being educated in the district schools of Stockbridge, Vt., first found employment in the woollen-mills of that town, where he continued for the next five years. He then went to Massachusetts, where he remained for about two years. At the end of that time he came to Concord, to take charge of the finishing-rooms in the mills of Messrs. B. F. & D. Holden, which have since been incorporated as the Concord Manufacturing Company; and he remained in their employ some seven years. He was subsequently appointed a station agent for the C. & C. Railroad, which position he held for more than six years. He was then employed at the Concord Water Works at West Concord, and was also appointed superintendent of Penacook Park. He was also connected with the police force of the city of Concord for ten years. At the present time he is engaged in the milk business, maintaining a fine herd of sixteen cows. Although anxious to take up arms in the defence of...

Biography of John Evans Robertson

John Evans Robertson, a wellknown ice dealer of Concord, was born May 9, 1843, in Warner, N.H., son of Harrison D. and Sarah C. (Evans) Robertson, both of Warner. The families of both parents were old residents of Merrimack County, New Hampshire. The maternal ancestors originally came from Newburyport, Mass., where Grandfather Benjamin Evans officiated as Sheriff, being also a prominent business man. John E. Robertson attended the public schools of Warner, and subsequently fitted for college in the academy at Henniker, N.H. However, after leaving school at the age of eighteen, he did not go to college. In 1864 he went to Montreal, and there engaged in the produce business, under the firm name of Buck, Robertson & Co. Six years later, on account of ill health, he returned to Warner, where he conducted a country store until 1874, when he came to Concord. Here he was assistant cashier of the National Savings Bank for eight years. Beginning in 1882 he dealt in coal, wood, and ice until 1888, when he sold out on account of failing health. Three years later he resumed the ice business, which he still carries on. He is a trustee and the assistant treasurer of the National Savings Bank. When the institution went into liquidation in 1877, he was appointed assignee by the court. He is also a trustee of the Guarantee Savings Bank of Concord. In Bradford, N.H., August 15, 1864, Mr. Robertson was married to Martha F. Paige, of Montreal. Of their three children two are living, namely: Shirlie Louise, the wife of William A. Whitney, of Claremont, N.H.; and Carleton...

Biography of Charles M. Rolfe

Charles M. Rolfe, a well-known manufacturer of Concord, is a native of this city, born August 18, 1841, son of Nathaniel and Mary J. (Moody) Rolfe. His paternal grandfather, also named Nathaniel, was one of the pioneer settlers of Concord, and came here from Haverhill, Mass. He secured the first water-power operated on the Merrimack River, and carried on a considerable lumbering business besides being engaged in farming. This water-power is still in possession of the family, and has been for the past seventy-five years. Grandfather Rolfe died in 1829, full of years and honor, and left to his sons the valuable water privilege above mentioned, besides a large tract of timber land. Nathaniel Rolfe, Jr., father of Charles M., was also a farmer and lumberman. He carried on a large trade, and furnished lumber for the frames of many of the great mills at Lawrence and Lowell, Mass. He is still living, a hale and hearty man, at the age of eighty-three years. His wife was Miss Mary J. Moody, a daughter of Joseph Moody, of Canterbury. She became the mother of six children-Charles, Joseph, Abial, John, Mary, and Arthur. Mary died at the age of nine years. Joseph was a New Hampshire sharpshooter in the Civil War, and saw much active service. He is now a resident of Minneapolis, Minn., where he deals in real estate and operates a plant for the manufacture of dredging machines. He has held many responsible positions there, having been County Clerk and a member of the School Board. Abial Rolfe is in business with his brother Charles. He married Georgie J....

Biographical Sketch of Robert H. Rolfe

Robert H. Rolfe, the courteous and efficient cashier and advertising manager of the Republican Press Association at Concord, N.H., was born here, October 16, 1863, and is the son of Henry Pearson and Mary Rebecca (Sherburne) Rolfe, of this city. In his boyhood he attended the public schools of Concord, and, after graduating from the high school, entered Dartmouth College, where he was graduated in the class of 1884. He then for a short time engaged in the study of law; but, feeling more inclination for a business career, he abandoned the thought of a profession, and entered the employ of the Boston & Lowell Railroad as an accountant. He afterward served the Boston & Maine Railroad in the same capacity. In 1889 he went to North Adams, Mass., as assistant superintendent of the Zylonite Manufacturing New Jersey. He then returned to Concord, and soon after was offered his present position of cashier and advertising manager of the Republican Press Association, which he fills with great acceptance to all concerned. After graduating from college, he entered the New Hampshire National Guard as a private in Company C of the Third Regiment of New Hampshire, and has been rapidly promoted until three years ago he attained the rank of Colonel in the regiment, and has held it ever since. Colonel Rolfe makes a fine officer; and not only is he a very popular young man among his own particular friends and associates, but he also possesses the good will of his fellowtownsmen...

Biography of Timothy B. Rossiter

Timothy B. Rossiter, one of the wealthiest men in Claremont, was born there, September 18, 1807, son of Sherman and Olive (Baldwin) Rossiter. Sir Edward Rossiter, the founder of the family, with his son and son’s wife, Dr. and Mrs. Bray Rossiter, embarked from Plymouth, England, on the ship “Mary and John,” March 20, 1630, and arrived at Nantasket, Mass., May 30, 1630. They began a settlement at Mattapan, and in the spring of 1636 removed to Windsor, Conn. Sir Edward Rossiter, who was chosen in London in 1629 to serve as an assistant to Governor Winthrop, died soon after his arrival in the colonies. Dr. Bray Rossiter, his son, removed in 1650 to Guilford, Conn., where he became a planter, and purchased in 1651 the Desbourough estate. Dr. Rossiter died September 30, 1672, leaving ten children. Josiah Rossiter, a son of the Doctor, born at Windsor, removed with his father to Guilford. For ten years, between the years 1700 and 1711, he was Assistant Governor in the colony of Connecticut, and for some years Recorder and Justice of the Peace. He had seventeen children. His death occurred January 31, 1716. Theophilus, his son, born February 12, 1696, married Abigail Pierson, November 18, 1725, became the father of fourteen children, and died April 9, 1770. His son, Captain William, who was born February 11, 1740, married Submit Chittenden, February 18, 1768, and died December 28, 1820, leaving eleven children. Sherman Rossiter, the father of Timothy B. Rossiter, born April 20, 1775, leaving Guilford, Conn., came up the Connecticut River to Claremont when that section was nearly all wilderness. He...

Biography of John P. Rounsevel

John P. Rounsevel, formerly a well-known wool buyer of Claremont, was born in Unity, N.H., January 2, 1815, son of Royal and Betsey (Sweat) Rounsevel. Rounseville, the original spelling of the name, was changed to the present form by Joseph Rounsevel about the year 1768. In 1749 Thomas Rounseville wrote from Ottery St. Mary to Philip Rounseville, of England, who afterward came to this country. He settled in Freetown, Mass., and was called by the townspeople King Philip. His son Joseph, who, born January 3, 1737, died in 1827, went to Washington, N.H., between 1768 and 1772, from Middleboro, Mass., having previously resided in East Freetown. Joseph was a good farmer, a well-read man, and a Justice of the Peace. He executed the legal business of the town, and represented Washington with other towns in the General Court. His children were: Alden, Charity, Phebe, John, Rosamond, and Royal. Alden married Hannah Wells. Charity married Manasseh Farnsworth in 1784. Phebe never married. John married Rebecca Chamberlain in 1768. Rosamond married Thomas Putnam in 1787. Royal’s children were: Joseph, Minerva, Elle I., Lyman, and John P. Of them Joseph, who was born in 1796, and died December 24, 1858, married Betsey Laughton, who had by him five children-Sarah, Harriet, Holmes, Lyman, and Marinda. Minerva, born in 1799, who married John Stowell, had no children, and died in July, 1848. Elle I., born February 15, 1801, who married Orrill Reckard, and had four children-Ellen H., Royal D., Mary, and William -died September 19, 1852. Lyman, born November 7, 1805, married Sarah Sparling, by whom he became the father of seven children-Thomas Eaton,...

Biography of Alvin W. Sanders

Alvin W. Sanders, one of the leading merchants of Pittsfield, was born in this town, October 5, 1850, son of William and Adeline (Reynolds) Sanders. His grandfather, Samuel Sanders, who was a resident of Strafford, N.H., followed shoemaking and farming throughout the active period of his life, and died at the age of seventy years. Samuel’s wife, whose maiden name was Betsey Cater, lived to be eighty years old. She was the mother of nine children, all now deceased, of whom William was the youngest. William Sanders was born in Strafford, and reared upon a farm. He learned the shoemaker’s trade, and afterward worked at it, and also conducted a good farm in Pittsfield. In politics he was a Democrat. He married for his first wife Abiagail Sanders, widow of William Sanders, of Strafford; and by that union there were five children, of whom the only survivor is Betsey. His second marriage was contracted with Adeline, daughter of John Reynolds, of Strafford; and she became the mother of five children, four of whom are living-Alvin W., Martin, Clara, and George. Martin wedded Eva Noyes, of Barnet, Vt.; and Clara is the wife of Benjamin Rollins, of Concord, N.H., and has two children-Florence and Bertha. Mrs. William Sanders, who is seventy-two years old, is residing at the homestead in this town. Alvin W. Sanders acquired his education in the schools of Barnstead, N.H. During the ensuing three years he was employed in various cotton-mills in this State. Then he was connected with the New Hampshire Insane Asylum for eleven years, serving in the capacity of keeper for five years, and...
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