Squando

Squando. An Abnaki sachem of the Sokoki, known generally as the “Sagamore of Saco” He was credited with seeing visions and was called by Mather “a strange, enthusiastical sagamore.” His wife and child had been insulted by the English, and he took part in the war of 1675-76 and in the burning of Saco.  He



Moxus

Moxus. A chief of the Abnaki, called also Agamagus, the first signer of the treaty of 1699, and seemingly the successor of Madokawandu (Drake, Inds. of N. Am., 294, 1880). He signed also the treaty with Gov. Dudley in 1702, but a year afterward unsuccessfully besieged the English fort at Casco, Me. He treated with



Chief Joseph Orono

Carved portrait of Chief Orono

A biography of Chief Joseph Orono as compiled from several different sources. Joseph was also known as the “Blue Eyed Chief.”



Pierre Paul Osunkhirhine

Osunkhirhine, Pierre Paul. An Abnaki Indian of St Francis, near Pierreville, Quebec, noted for his translations, especially of religious works, into the Penobscot dialect of the Abnaki language, published from 1830 to 1844.  He received a good education at Moore’s Charity School, Hanover N. H. and returned to his home as a Protestant missionary.  In



Assacumbuit

Assacumbuit. An Abnaki (“Tarratine”) chief who appeared in history about 1696. He was a faithful adherent of the French and rendered important aid to Iberville and Montigny in the reduction of Fort St Johns, N. B., Nov. 30, 1696. With two other chiefs and a few French soldiers Assacumbuit attacked the fort at Casco, Maine,



Aspenquid

Aspenquid. An Abnaki of Agamenticus, Maine, forming a curious figure in New England tradition. He is said to have been born toward the end of the 16th century and converted to Christianity, to have preached it to the Indians, traveled much, and died among his own people at the age of about 100 years. Up



Abbigadasset

Abbigadasset,  An Abenaki sachem whose residence was on the coast of Maine near the mouth of Kennebec River. He conveyed tracts of land to Englishmen conjointly with Kennebis.  In 1667 he deeded Swans Island to Humphrey Davy12 FootnotesDrake, Biography and history of the Indians of North America, bk. 3, 98, 1834. ↩Hodge, Handbook of American Indians,



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