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History Gazetteer and Directory of Devonshire 1850

The History, Gazetteer and Directory of Devonshire 1850 provides a historical look at the county of Devonshire prior to 1850. Devonshire, the largest county in England, except Yorkshire, and the most westerly except Cornwall, ranked among the first in agricultural importance, and the sixth in amount of population. Occupying the whole breadth of the central portion of that great south-western peninsula of the British Island, which juts out between the Bristol and English Channels, and having more than 150 miles of sea coast, and some fine navigable rivers and broad estuaries, Devonshire was one of the most important maritime counties in the kingdom.

1850 Gazetteer of Yealmpton England

YEALMPTON, a large and respectable village, with many good houses, is pleasantly seated on a salubrious acclivity, overlooking the river Yealm, 7 miles E. by S. of Plymouth, and 5½ miles W. of Modbury. It is on the high road to Kingsbridge, &c., and about a mile below it the Yealm spreads into a broad estuary. It has a great cattle market on the fourth Wednesday of every month, and is noted for the social and friendly intercourse of its inhabitants. Petty Sessions are held here every third Monday, by the magistrates of Ermington and Plympton Division, to whom Mr. Thomas Kelly is clerk. The parish contains 1317 souls, and 3432A. 3R. 2P. of land, generally fertile and mostly arable, and including the hamlets of Dunstone and Yealm Bridge, and many scattered farm houses, &c., and three corn mills. Yealmpton is described as a borough in ancient records, and tradition says the Saxon King Ethelwold had a palace here, where his lieutenant Lipsius, is said to have died, and to have been buried in the churchyard, where his gravestone is still to be seen. The manor was given by King John to Matthew Fitzherbert, and afterwards passed to the Earls of Huntingdon, one of whom sold it in 1580 to Sir John Hele. The heiress of Edmund Pollexfen brought it to an ancestor of its present owner, E. R. P. Bastard, Esq., of KITLEY, a large and elegant mansion, in the Elizabethan style, erected in 1825 by the late Edmund Pollexfen Bastard, Esq., from designs by Mr. Repton. It has many handsome and elegantly furnished apartments, and stands in...

1850 Gazetteer of Woodleigh England

WOODLEIGH, which gives name to a deanery, is a small village, in a healthy and elevated situation, on the east side of the Aven valley, 3½ miles N. of Kingsbridge. Its parish contains 269 souls, and 2319 acres of land, including the hamlets of Priston and Hendham. The manor belonged at an early period to the Damarells, but it now belongs – 3/8ths to J. B. Swete, Esq., 1/8th to the heirs of F. Wise, Esq., ¼ to the heirs of Mrs. S. Edmonds, and ¼ to the heirs of Mrs. E. Netherton. the chief owners of the soil are J. B. Swete, J. Netherton, J. Luscombe, and W. B. Fortescue, Esqrs. Wood Barton, formerly a seat of the Fortescues, was a large quadrangular mansion, of the 15th century, but only two of its sides now remain. The Church (St. Mary,) is a small antique fabric, with a tower and three bells. It has lately been renovated, and a new east window inserted. The interior has several handsome mural tablets, belonging to the Luscombe, Cornish, Edmonds, and other families. The silver flagons given by Lady Amy Fortescue in 1686, weighs 4lbs. 12oz., and is emblazoned with the Fortescue and Courtenay arms. The rectory, valued in K.B. at £22. 8s. 4d., and in £420 in 1831, is in the patronage of Exeter College, Oxford, and incumbency of the Rev. George Dawson, M.A., who has 85A. 2R. 6P. of glebe, and a large and handsome residence. The poor have a yearly rent-charge of 35s. out of Lowerdale...

1850 Gazetteer of Wembury England

WEMBURY, a scattered village near the sea cliffs between Plymouth Sound and the mouth of the Yealm, 6 miles S.E. by S. of Plymouth, has in its parish 616 souls and 3670 acres of land, including the hamlets of Knighton and Down Thomas. The manor of Wembury belonged to Plympton Priory till the dissolution, and afterwards passed to various families. In the 16th century it belonged to Sir John Hele, sergeant at law, who built here a magnificent mansion, at the cost of £20,000, and enclosed a park, which had a salt water lake, supplied by the tides. After his death this manor was sold for the payment of his debts. It was purchased in 1803, by Thos. Lockyer, Esq., who pulled down the mansion, and built a smaller house for his residence. E. R. P. Bastard, Esq., is now lord of the manor and the royalty of the river Plym (sic), from Kitley to Plymouth Sound. C. B. Calmady, Esq., is lord of the manor of Langdon, and resides at Langdon Hall, a neat mansion, which has been the seat of his family for several generations. T. Lockyer and several smaller owners have estates here, and Sir Edward Thornton, G.C.B., has a handsome seat in the parish. The Church (St. Werburg,) stands near the sea cliff, and is a small antique structure, with a tower and three bells. It contains several handsome monuments in memory of the Heles, and an iron helmet supposed to have been worn by Sir Warwick Hele. The perpetual curacy, valued in 1831 at only £83, is in the patronage of the Dean and...

1850 Gazetteer of Ugborough England

UGBOROUGH is a neat and pleasant village, on the slopes of an eminence, surrounded by higher hills, 2½ miles E. of Ivybridge, and N.N.E. of Modbury, and 1½ mile S.W. of Kingsbridge Road Station. Its parish contains 1532 souls, and 8659 acres of land, generally fertile, and extending westward to the river Erme. It includes several handsome mansions, and many respectable farm-houses, and the small hamlets of Ludbrooke, Cheston, Nilham, Wrangaton, Fileham, and part of Ivybridge. There is a conduit in the centre of the village, and the church stands on the crown of the hill, which commands delightful views. Large cattle fairs are held here on the last Tuesdays in May and November, and here was formerly a monthly fair. The manor of Ugborough (Ulgeberge,) belonged to Alured Brito at Domesday Survey. It afterwards passed to the Briwere, Loring, Bonville, Grey, Harris, and Palk families. The heiress of the latter married Sir H. Carew, whose son, Sir Walter Palk Carew, Bart., is now lord of this and other manors in this parish, which comprises 200A. of wood, 150A. of orchards, and 2631A. of open common, rising in bold hills on the north. S. Savery, G. Mitchell, W. Widdicombe, J. Lang, J. P. Sawyer, and J. L. Templer, Esqrs., have estates here, and part of the parish belongs to several smaller owners, mostly freeholders. FOWELLSCOMBE, the large and handsome seat of Servington Savery, Esq., is a fine mansion, in the Tudor style, delightfully situated about a mile from the village. It was built in 1537, by Sir Thos. Foswell, whose family resided here for many generations. Sir Edmund Fowell...

1850 Gazetteer of Totnes England

TOTNES, an ancient borough and market town, which retains some portions of its once formidable castle, and gives name to an archdeaconry and deanery, to a large union, and to county court and polling districts; is picturesquely seated on the western bank of the navigable river Dart, opposite the suburb of Bridgetown, 10 miles N.W. by W. of Dartmouth, 22 miles S. by W. of Exeter, 22 miles E. by N. of Plymouth, 9 miles W.S.W. of Torquay, and 194 miles W.S.W. of London. It has a station on the South Devon Railway. The Dart is navigable to it for vessels of 150 tons burthen, and a steam packet plies daily between it and Dartmouth. Its parish contains 967A. 1R. 24P. of land, mostly in meadows and pastures; and had 2503 souls in 1801; 2725 in 1811; 3128 in 1821; and 3442 in 1831; but they had increased to 3849 in 1841, including 253 in the union workhouse. BRIDGETOWN, on the opposite of the river, in Berry Pomeroy parish, and in Haytor Hundred, is a handsome eastern suburb of the town, and forms part of the borough of Totnes, swelling its total population to about 4600 souls. The borough comprises the whole parish of Totnes and the manor of Bridgetown, the latter of which was added to it by the Parliamentary and Municipal Reform Acts of 1832 and 1835. A handsome stone bridge crosses the river and a small island, between the two places, and was built by subscription, at the cost of £12,000, in 1828, in lieu of the ancient narrow bridge. Steps descend from it to the...

1850 Gazetteer of Thurlestone England

THURLESTONE, 4½ miles W.S.W. of Kingsbridge, is a small scattered village, on rising ground, near the beach of Bigbury Bay. Its parish contains 437 souls, and 1768 acres of fertile land, including the hamlets of Buckland, Avenmouth, and Bantham, the latter of which is a small fishing village, with fine sands, and a salmon pool and harbour for barges. The Earl of Devon is lord of the manor, but part of the parish belongs to several smaller freeholders. The river Aven bounds the parish on the north, and the Bay on the west. On the coast is a remarkable arched rock, through which boats have sailed. It has for centuries braved the foaming surge: hence the proverb, “Brave every shock, Like Thurlestone Rock.” It is of the red conglomerate formation. Clannacombe, a large Elizabethan mansion, which has been modernised, is the seat of H. R. Square, Esq. The Church is an ancient structure, with a tower and five bells. The pulpit is finely carved, and partly composed of elegant pannels taken from the screen. The rectory, valued in K.B. at £25. 10s., and in 1831 at £383, is in the patronage of Sir. J. B. Y. Buller, Bart., and incumbency of the Rev. P. A. Ilbert, M.A., who has 36A. of glebe, and a large and handsome residence, erected by himself. The parish school, established in 1844, is supported by the...

1850 Gazetteer of Stokenham England

STOKENHAM, or Stockingham, a small pleasant village, 5½miles E. by S. of Kingsbridge, has in its parish 1619 inhabitants, and 5920 acres of land, including six villages, extending 4 miles along the picturesque shore of Start Bay, of which the following are the names and population :- Chillington, 325 ; Beeson, 106 ; Beesands, 104 ; Halsands, 128 ; Kellaton, or Kellington, 105 ; and Torcross, 192. several of them are fishing villages, noted for fine crabs, which are in high repute in London. The parish extends southward to Start Point, where there is a lighthouse. It includes also the hamlets of Bickerton, Dunstone, Cornborough, and many scattered houses. TORCROSS, near Ley lake and Slapton Sands Hotel (see Slapton), is a pretty little bathing place, with several lodging-houses for visitors. An annual regatta is held here. The parish is generally fertile, and it extends westward in a picturesque vale to Frogmore, where there is a creek from Kingsbridge estuary. Sir R. L. Newman, Bart., of Mamhead, is lord of the manor of Stokenham, and has a neat marine residence, called Stokely House, built about 35 years ago. The manor has been held by the Fitzjohns, Fitzherbert, Courtenays, Hastings, and Carys, and was sold by the latter to the Newmans. Miss Burnell is lady of the manor of Kellaton, and A. B. E. Holdsworth, Esq., owns Stokenham Priory estate, and has a picturesquely situated mansion near the bay called Widdecombe, rebuilt about 1725. Coleridge, a handsome new mansion, in the Elizabethan style, is the seat of John Allen, Esq., who owns the estate which gives name to this hundred. The...

1850 Gazetteer of South Milton England

MILTON, (SOUTH) a small village, in a deep fertile valley, 3 miles S.W. of Kingsbridge, has in its parish 475 souls, and 1556A. 3R. 11P. of land, including Upton and Sutton hamlets. Mrs. Prideaux is lady of the manor, but a great part of the parish belongs to W. R. Ilbert, Esq., of Horsewell House, a large and neat mansion, formerly the seat of the Roopes, from whom it passed to the Ilberts. Holwell belongs to Mrs. Gilbert and the Rev. E. Reed and the Earl of Devon have small estates here. The Church is a handsome structure, of perpendicular architecture, with a lofty embattled tower, containing six bells. The benefice is annexed to the vicarage of West Alvington, and the tithes were commuted in 1839, the vicarial for £128. 4s., and the rectorial for £219. 1s. W. R. Ilbert, Esq., is lessee of the latter, under the Dean and Chapter of Salisbury. The Parish Lands, &c., comprises 7 acres, and 4 cottages, let for £15. 6s., applied to the use of the church and...

1850 Gazetteer of Slapton England

SLAPTON, a pleasant village on the acclivity, rising from the central part of the coast of Start Bay, 6 miles S.W. by S. of Dartmouth, has in its parish 726 inhabitants, 3260 acres of tithe free land, and many scattered houses, commanding fine views of the bay and coast. On the beach is the Sands Hotel, from which visitors have a fine promenade at low water along the sands to within a mile of Start point. The hotel is elegantly fitted up for the accommodation of visitors, and about 200 yards from the beach is a long fresh-water lake of about 300 acres, called the Ley or Hey, well stocked with fish and wild fowl, and divided from the sea in some places only by a ridge called the Long Sand. The manor is dismembered, and was formerly held of the See of Exeter, by the service of being steward at the bishop’s installation feast. Sir R. L. Newman, Bart., Major Bent, and the Paige, Tucker, Holdsworth, Bastard, Wise, Wakeham, and other families have freehold estates here. Pole or Poole Priory, in this parish, was long the seat of the Brians, Ameridiths, and Hawkins, and now belongs to Mr. Paige. The ruins of the old mansion were removed about 1800, except the lofty tower, which stands in the garden. The Church (St. Mary,) is an ancient structure, with a tower and five bells. The screen is beautiful, and the clustered columns have foliated capitals. The living is a perpetual curacy, valued at only £96 per annum, arising from a modus of £15, and land here and at Halwell. Wm....
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